• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

By Analysing Chapter 2 consider the presentation of the friendship that exists with Stephen and Keith

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

By Analysing Chapter 2 consider the presentation of the friendship that exists with Stephen and Keith In the first chapter of Michael Frayn's novel 'Spies', amongst the limited amount of characters introduced, is Keith. The reader is given no background knowledge about him, only that "Does he ever think about the things that happened that summer?" meaning that Keith is a significant person as it is implied that he shared the narrator's (revealed as Stephen in chapter 2) experience that particular, somewhat haunting summer. However in Chapter 2 a lot more information is given about Keith and details about the depth of friendship between Keith and Stephen begin to emerge. In Chapter 2, one of the first memories Stephen comes to is that of his house. "...in spite of the fact that it's attached to No.3- the only semidetached pair in the Close," indicating that Stephen is somewhat the odd one out, when he says 'only,' and almost uncomfortable about admitting to this. He then goes on to describe his ghastly neighbours who were 'even more shameful' than his house, and how they 'brought us down with them.,' and he then goes on to expresses his distress about being attached to the 'undesirables'. ...read more.

Middle

Keith is then bought into the story, and his appearance, like the houses, is the exact opposite of Stephen; 'His shirt, though, not to short, his shorts are not to long.' Also he is described as 'neat' compared to his 'unsatisfactory' friend. However the most significant thing about the boy's appearances is their uniform. The narrator describes how once seeing Keith, he no longer views himself as 'monochrome' or slightly ashamed of his younger self. This is purely down to the fact that he can now see both their belts. The boys each have a different colour belt; Stephen's being green whereas Keith's is yellow. The reader then learns why, as well as some more background information on Stephen and Keith. "We're socially colour coded for ease of reference." Meaning that being 'green' is 'the colours of a wrong school'. This tells the reader that the boys do not go to school together, and Keith goes to a much higher rated school in the society around them. From this alone the reader can gain a better understanding of the social differences between the two boys, the houses also lead to the fact that Keith is a great deal wealthier than Stephen. ...read more.

Conclusion

The conflicting backgrounds of the boys don't seem to affect their relationship in the slightest. To summarise, although the author presents the boys to be of entirely different backgrounds, wealth, and social status, he makes it known to the reader that these are the foundations on which the boy's friendship is built on. Being different to each other only draws them closer together. For instance, Keith calls the shots, but Stephen is still astonished and proud that Keith even wants to be his friend (as he is so ashamed of himself and his family) so doesn't feel resentful in the slightest, 'He was the officer corps in our two man army. I was the Other Ranks- and grateful to be so.' Although Stephen may envy Keith's lifestyle, he certainly doesn't hold any judgement towards him, and is glad that he gets to share an experience of how the other half lives. Despite the various class/economical clashes, the boys are still great friends, and seem to follow suit that opposites do attract. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sophie Tataryn MCM ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Other Authors section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Other Authors essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Discuss Nick Hornby s presentation of Marcus in chapters 1-10 of About a Boy

    4 star(s)

    He is very protective of his mum. When they have fished eating and arguing, Marcus finds the TV remote and "Zapped through the channels. He didn't want to watch any of the soaps, because soaps were full of trouble, and he was worried that the trouble in the soaps would

  2. What do you find interesting about Frayn's portrayal of Stephen? ...

    he intensely recalls the past and is therefore transported mentally back in time. Moreover, the sensory description given by Frayn enables him to present a colourful and moving portrayal of Stephen. Stephen and Keith's relationship is presented as being complex and fundamental to the plot of the story.

  1. Compare and contrast the two pairs of lovers in 'Much Ado about Nothing'. Consider ...

    openly he is full of bravado for example when he opens up to Don Pedro; he constantly performs to the audience and other characters, by exaggerating everything. In Act 2 Scene he begs Don Pedro to send him away when Beatrice enters "Will your grace command me any service to the world's end ?

  2. How do Gold Cadillac and Country Lovers differ in their presentation of Prejudice?

    This reflects family ties and relationships, which produces a warm impression to the reader. We learn from the tone and the dialogue that the Gold Cadillac is a symbol of security and luxury, 'it was all good inside. Good leather seats.

  1. The Inspector calls

    instance, he shows the photograph of Eva Smith to the person he is referring to. Not anybody else '(INSPECTOR takes a photograph, about postcard size, out of his pocket and goes to BIRLING. Both GERALD and ERIC rise to have a look at the photograph, but the INSPECTOR interposes himself between them and the photograph.)'

  2. An inspector calls

    The audience know that this has already happened and that he is wrong. This makes them think that he is not really as intelligent as he thinks he is and that he is just big headed. It creates a dramatic effect because it grabs the attention of the audience.

  1. From your study of three Sherlock Holmes cases, what do you consider to be ...

    Another key component of detective fictions is clues and red herrings. Red herrings are false clues that lead the reader to believe something that is not correct. For example in Silver Blaze the cravat that Straker had in his hand was a red herring as was the knife in his hand and the gash on his thigh.

  2. Essay analysing" The lemon orchard" by Alex la Duma

    a lesser life form, even than dogs; for the man would gladly look after a dog but saw no harm in beating up a man who stood up for his rights.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work