• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

By close analysis of the passage (Line 200-250), explain what this adds to our understanding of Cleopatra and how she holds power over Antony

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

By close analysis of the passage (Line 200-250), explain what this adds to our understanding of Cleopatra and how she holds power over Antony. At this point in the play, Shakespeare has previously established the character of Cleopatra, as well as the nature of her relationship with Antony. She is portrayed as possessive, commanding and dramatic. Her own emotions are of supreme importance to her, and she has a violent temper. The relationship between Antony and Cleopatra appears as though there is an imbalance of power, Cleopatra maintaining the more dominant role. Her influence over men is notorious in the play, as her previous relationships with powerful men such as Julius Caesar are frequently mentioned. When the Triumvirate exit a conversation emerges between Enobarbus and Agrippa, two loyal followers of Antony and Caesar. ...read more.

Middle

as he hears the tales. This mirrors many other events in the play, where Cleopatra is condemned by the Romans, not only for seducing the great soldier Antony, but for her Egyptian heritage. An example of this is in Act I, when Philo and Demetrius criticize Antony's neglected, labelling Cleopatra as a "wrangling queen" and a "slave". She is also called "Salt Cleopatra" and an enchantress who has made Antony "the noble ruin of her magic" later on in the play. But to view Cleopatra as such is to reduce her character to the rather narrow perspective of the Romans, who standing to lose their honour through her agency, are most threatened by her. This threat has much to do with Cleopatra's beauty and open sexuality, which, as Enobarbus points out, is "awe-inspiring". ...read more.

Conclusion

The language is hugely contrasting from that used before, such as "flower-soft hands" and "perfumed". These are very sensual words, used to describe the moment when Cleopatra is coming to meet Antony in her magnificent boat. These also contrast Egypt to Rome, which is very logical, dutiful and seemingly dull compared with the emotional and mysterious Egyptian ways. Comparing the queen to Venus, Goddess of love, Enobarbus maintains that Antony will never be able to leave her, despite obstacles such as his marriage to Octavia. This passage lets us see that Enobarbus is obviously quite sensitive to the charms of the East, and more importantly, to the charms of Cleopatra. He predicts, indiscreetly considering he is speaking with a close associate of Caesar, correctly that Antony will never leave her. ?? ?? ?? ?? Claire Jones 12LRD ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Antony & Cleopatra section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Antony & Cleopatra essays

  1. Explore Shakespeare's presentation of EITHER Cleopatra OR Antony in Act three Scene thirteen. How ...

    In Act three scene thirteen, Cleopatra and Enobarbus are discussing whose fault it is that Antony left the battle.

  2. Explore the love between antony and cleopatra throughout shakespeares play

    As Cleopatra learns what her fate at Caesar's hands may be, she continues to excel the virtues of Antony, 'I dream'd there was an emperor Antony: - O, such another sleep, that I might see but such another man!' The passion she appears to have whilst talking of Antony leads the audience to believe she had such feelings for him.

  1. Evaluate his taints and honours, thus enabling us to draw our own conclusions about ...

    We remain to see whether Cleopatra can and will be worthy of Antony's assertion of the first Act: that the nobleness of life is in the embrace of such a pair. At this point Cleopatra is still alive and has sent Mardain with news of her death in order to find out how it was received by Antony.

  2. "Rare Egyptian" or "Foul Egyptian"? Discuss how Cleopatra is presented to us. What is ...

    It is much more insulting than when others do it, because it is a typical 'Roman' insult, and it seems that Antony is trying to prove that he is Roman and therefore 'not hers' in the use of it. He calls her "half-blasted", "one that looks on feeders", a "boggler"

  1. Antony And Cleopatra

    The union between Antony and Cleopatra is not a bond of love or passion just an agreement more like, to keep Caesar off Antony's case. Furthermore the main essence of this scene is contained within the lines of the unknown protagonist Enobarbus who plays a very crucial part .

  2. An exploration of the way in which Shakespeare presents the character of Enobarbus and ...

    His ability to see Antony for what he is, human, is something that creates the feeling of true friendship. Enobarbus is often critical of Antony and is not afraid to speak his thoughts. He claims that 'Antony only' was to blame for their defeat at Actium as he allowed his 'will' (passion)

  1. Explore Shakespeare's presentation of EITHER Cleopatra OR Antony in Act three Scene thirteen. How ...

    Shakespeare implies that Cleopatra gradually grows in confidence to become who she is now.coec ecr seececw orec eck inec foec ec: We often find out what Cleopatra is like through other peoples opinions. Shakespeare has written the play like this to suggest that Cleopatra is very well known and easily described and explained.

  2. In the play Antony and Cleopatra, the character of Cleopatra is one of many ...

    'Other women cloy the appetites they feed, but she makes hungry' Cleopatra is a woman who is never satisfied with what she has got in her life, she is not like most women who appreciate what they have, Cleopatra feeds on what she can have which is more substantial than she already has got and keeps following this pattern.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work