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By reference to three key scenes, shoe how much Macbeth's character changes during the course of the play: Act I scene VII, Act III scene IV, Act V scene III

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Introduction

26 February 2003 By reference to three key scenes, shoe how much Macbeth's character changes during the course of the play: Act I scene VII, Act III scene IV, Act V scene III The first we hear of Macbeth is when a bloodied soldier looking valiant after battle with great gaping wounds, describes a Great War hero: "For brave Macbeth well he deserves that name". Shakespeare uses this speech to show Macbeth's loyalty by saying he fought off a whole army and all for king and country. He also said their enemy ran away, then launched another attack and that Macbeth and Banquo fought it off even with their severe wounds: "They meant to bath in reeking wounds" And they still repelled the second attack, as though with renewed strength: "So they doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe". We can see from this that Macbeth is a noble, loyal and trusted man, let alone a war hero. After Macbeth meets the witches, his personality begins to change. He becomes consumed with ambitions. In my understanding it was always there, like a petrol station with petrol running everywhere and leaky gas mains (always a fire hazard), the witches just threw in a Zippo. ...read more.

Middle

Although Macbeth can wash Duncan's blood from his hands he cannot wash it from his conscience: "Will all great Neptune's oceans wash this blood clear from my hand? No" Macbeth is duly crowned king Banquo reveals his suspicions about Macbeth in a soliloquy: "Thou hast it now king, Cawdor, Glamis, all the wired women promised and I fear thou play'dst most foully for't" Macbeth holds a banquet and invites every one. After this Macbeth hires an assassin to kill Banquo and Fleance his son. Macbeth seems to be losing his moral standing the further he gets into the play. Banquo sacrifices his life to save his son and Fleance gets away. The assassin shows up at the banquet and stands at the door to give Macbeth the news "there is blood upon thy face" The murderer then seeks praise for the murder of Banquo: Macbeth then asks about Fleance and is agitated to hear that he is still alive: "The worm that's fled hath nature in time will venom breed, no teeth for the time present" Shakespeare uses a metaphor to show how Macbeth is afraid of Banquo and Fleance Macbeth then goes to sit down at the table but he thinks his place is taken and when the figure stands up it is the ghost of Banquo. ...read more.

Conclusion

Macduff tells Macbeth he was born by caesarean section and so was not born of woman and he kills Macbeth. In conclusion I would say that Macbeth's character changes drastically throughout the play. At the start he is a good and noble soldier who would never betray the king but gets persuaded easily by his wife. Then as the story progresses we see him start to lose morals as he orders the killing of Banquo on his own but is still upset about it, we can see that because of his hallucinations (seeing the ghost). Then he orders the killing of lady Macduff and her children showing he has gone of the scale and is totally evil. Whilst fighting Macduff he is arrogant and spares his life at one point in the fight. So when Macbeth is told that Macduff is not born of women he is shocked and dies a wicked fool. So we see the down fall of such a brave character we saw at the start because of a few predictions and the ambition. For if he saw what being king would do to him I doubt he would have wanted to be king and would have been contented but was tricked by the evil of the witches. ...read more.

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