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By referring to their words and actions in Section One of John's Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, describe George and Lennie's characters and the nature of their friendship.

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Introduction

By referring to their words and actions in Section One of John's Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, describe George and Lennie's characters and the nature of their friendship. After a detailed description of the surrounding of the Salinas River the silent harmony of nature is disturbed by two men as they walk along the river bed. They were both dressed in denim trousers and coats and wore a shapeless black hat. However, despite that they are wearing the same things Steinbeck continues to describe each one showing the reader the obvious differences between them. The first person Steinbeck brings to view is George, a small man of average height and weight, with dark eyes and strong, sharp features. Alongside him walked Lennie whom Steinbeck portrays as George's total opposite. He was a big man with a shapeless face and huge shoulders leading to long arms that hung loosely at his side as he dragged his feet along. ...read more.

Middle

Though he doesn't intend too he has a tendency to get in trouble mainly because of his obsession for soft texture. He starts off innocently simple wanting to touch the martial or fur however when he is forced to let go he simply clings on out of fear and that often makes the situation worse such as when George recalls the story of weed: "Well, how the hell did she know you just wanted to feel her dress? She jerks back and you hold on like it was a mouse. She yells and we got to hide in a irrigation ditch all day with guys looking for us". Despite Lennie's habit of getting in trouble George doesn't abandon him even though at times he wants too. Ever since the one person who used to take care of him died, being his Aunt Clara, George took it upon himself to take care of Lennie. ...read more.

Conclusion

Both him and Lennie, like many other ranch workers in those times, were in search of the American dream. However, they have their own special version. To them it signifies independence from employers and poverty but also freedom from the worry and anxiety of Lennie getting in trouble. Though George is realistic and doubts that the dream of owning their own land would ever come true Lennie gives him that hope that maybe it can happen after all. They are each other's motivation and inspiration. Lennie keeps opening George's mind to the dream by constantly asking him to recall it and George keeps Lennie believing through what he says and how he says it. Their friendship is considered strange to most people as workers in those times usually travel alone but together they are able to fight off the prejudice of the world and most importantly loneliness. They may seem like complete opposites but in reality they are merely two parts that fit together to create one composite whole. ...read more.

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