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"By the end of Act 1 we see both the birth of happiness and tragedy." How far do you find this to be true? Romeo and Juliet.

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"By the end of Act 1 we see both the birth of happiness and tragedy." How far do you find this to be true? "Romeo and Juliet" is in one sense tragic since tragic also means death or killing in journalistic terms. Act 1 ends with Juliet, a dying swan, being crushed in mid sentence by an alien figure, the nurse. The nurse considers love to be the lust of "when maids lie on their backs." Thus Juliet's love was thwarted due to her being labelled a Capulet. Labels should mean nothing, yet the substantial barrier rises up with surprising effectiveness at the end of the scene. Perhaps through fear but it is questionable that Juliet's obedient upper-class upbringing plays a part in her immediate departure i as she is told to "Come let's away." Her Capulet label almost eliminates Romeo from her grasp; she talks of this match to be a "prodigious birth of love is to me." She compares not having love to not having life. This Tragedy is born out of the instant love and followed by a sonnet shared by the two lovers. It is where no intrusion can take place and at this time no tragedy is in the two lovers' minds. This romantic exchange brought happiness into Romeo's life for the first time in a long time. ...read more.


Yet later Romeo appears to be the little boy who when he is good he is very good, yet when he is bad (i.e. not in love) he is the pits. In earlier parts of the Act he dearly loves fair Rosaline, but she will forever be his unrequited love. He is and shall be forever loathsome. Like someone looking back at things he could and never did do. Romeo still shows his teenage qualities when in love with Juliet, he wants to 'run away from his fears' when he senses that one of the Capulets may come between Juliet and him. Another thing is that he will always love Rosaline and no one else but her. Then there is Romeo's childish dreaming which mischievous Mercutio picks up in his speech about Queen Mab. This typifies the play since The Queen Mab may bring happiness as "She gallops night by night, through lovers brains and they dream of love." The problem being that she also may "Driveth o'er a soldier's neck, and then dreams he of cutting foreign throats." Esentially this proclaims that there may be joy and great things in dreaming, but there may be trouble ahead. Could this be speaking about love and relationships? ...read more.


However, it is ironic that they don't and as most people realise. Yet the feud continues but more positively their love does as well. Thus Romeo and Juliet confirm that Mercutio is wrong, "love is a tender thing" but it is not. Something so tender and weak would not prevail through two battling hordes. It is this human magic which does succeed. The match of Romeo and Juliet was in the stars as the prologue said "Two star-crossed lovers." It is the stars and their fate to fall in Love but their sacrifice, which made them love for more than a moment. Their perfect moment was in the Capulet house but a terrible thing stopped that. Later in the play there are more tragic moments but sooner or later the two lovers die. It is better to die in Love than to die without Love. As to die in love is to be in love forever, as Samuel Coleridge said to live forever is "a curse in a dead mans eye." Through life both happiness and tragedy may be born, sometimes they come hand in hand. Is this because everybody is equal and the world shall stay equal? Some people having it more 'Equal' than others. Will we ever find out? That is before we are in the stars, perhaps Romeo & Juliet know? Another solution is the government know, why else would they be preventing euthanasia? ...read more.

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