• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Can communism flourish under human control?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Can communism flourish under human control? ************************************************************************ In Animal Farm, George Orwell portrays the events of the Russian Revolution as a comical satire. The fable is based on a stereotypical farm set out in the country. However, he uses its characters to symbolize the players of the Russian Revolution. Inside Manor Farm, which symbolizes Russia, the animals plot a revolution to overthrow Farmer Jones, who characterizes Czar Nicholas. Orwell uses his dry sense of humour and irony to cast an entertaining and interesting perspective of the Russian Revolution. The revolution as we know it was achieved in the October Revolution, 1917. The revolt was lead by a man named Vladimir Ilyich Lenin. He led the Bolshevik Party with the influence of a German economist, Karl Marx, who wrote the book, Das Kapital and his communist philosophy. ...read more.

Middle

Stalin gained total control in 1928; he lied to the Russian public, set up secret forces and squashed any opposition who dared to raise a voice. He made false promises of freedom and equality while ironically becoming a tyrant himself. The characters that play the Bolsheviks are the pigs in George Orwell's parody of the revolution. Napoleon is described as being corrupt and greedy, just as Joseph Stalin once was. George Orwell believed that the ideas and suggestions of communism were superb and gives the impression of a perfect society; however, he did not have faith in communism successfully working due to the irrepressible desires and greed of human nature. Orwell shows this as he describes Napoleon's character transition throughout the fable. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the end both Stalin and Napoleon has great potential, but washed it away with the temptation of power. The idea of communism and socialism disappears as Napoleon adapts the commandments to his suiting and institutes his own version of 'The Beasts of England'. Napoleon, Stalin, both become mere dictators, tyrants. Animal Farm is a success at making a parody of the Russian revolution. To the unaware, the novel is your average fable with power-hungry pigs walking on their hind legs and taking over the world. However, to the sharp minded, the depth of the real meaning of this political allegory is exposed. It is to destroy the myth stating that a true and pure society can prosper in the real world. In both cases the industry was strengthened, yet the hard-working innocent were ignored and treated as rogues. Power, greed, corruption and filth decay the once great ideas into scrap. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Animal Farm section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Animal Farm essays

  1. Orwell & Marx.

    that they take a green tablecloth and paint a white hoof and a horn on it similar to the hammer and sickle of the former Soviet Union. It is a flag that flies over the newly-named Animal Farm and at whose base lies a gun taken from a helper of Mr.

  2. Animal Farm.

    Napoleon passes a death sentence on Snowball, offering a bushel of apples to the traitor's killer. He then gives a passionate speech in which he convinces the animals that they must rebuild the windmill, despite the backbreaking toil involved. "Long live the windmill!"

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work