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Catcher in the rye

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Introduction

Patrick Doyle Sunday 26th October 2008 Explore the idea that Holden is on a quest in the novel. What is he searching for? Throughout the novel, 'The Catcher in the Rye', Holden Caulfield, The Main Character, also the narrator, is on a big and difficult journey through Adolescence. He always feels really down, depressed and blue about everything throughout the three days the book is set on. He mentions this depression a few times in the book. One of them, by saying 'Anyway, it made me feel depressed and lousy again, and I damn near got my coat back and went back to the hotel, but it was too early and I didn't feel much like being all alone.' Holden Caulfield is looking for the meaning of life and his destiny. He is looking for some friends that care about him, as all his friends at his old school were unpleasant towards him, which meant he didn't like most of them. ...read more.

Middle

He needs human interaction; someone to tell him he is on the right path and that everything will be alright. It also demonstrates that he is looking for someone to give him the love and affection he wants so much, he needs to be accepted. Two examples of this are when he asks a cab driver 'Would you care to stop on the way and join me for a cocktail, on me, I'm loaded', and when he is on the train he asks Mrs Morrow who is the mother of one of his school friends, 'would you care for a cocktail? We can go to the club car'. Both decline his desperate offer. Throughout the novel, he is always very depressed and suicidal. An example of a time he shows us this is when he says 'I felt like jumping out the window. I probably would've done it too, if I'd been sure somebody'd cover me up as soon as I landed. ...read more.

Conclusion

He has phrased this as 'What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff'. Although there is more understanding of teenagers in the present day the progression from childhood to adulthood still presents a lot of the issues that Salinger writes about in this novel. You were either a child or an adult, there was no transition. At the end of the novel, Holden meets Phoebe and they go to the zoo, because earlier on in the day, he gets a note sent to her at school to let her know that he is going away. But when he and phoebe spends some time together, he takes her to go on the carousel and realises what matters to him the most, the people who love him. So he decides to go home. His quest is complete. He has found out who the people who love him most are and he has found the love and affection he wanted. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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