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Chapter 15 is a main chapter of the novel in terms of plot, characters, relationships, themes and genre so far because everything in this chapter links up to something that has happened in the past. Most

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Introduction

Consider the idea that chapter 15 is a main chapter in the novel in terms of plot, characters, relationships, themes and genres. Chapter 15 is a main chapter of the novel in terms of plot, characters, relationships, themes and genre so far because everything in this chapter links up to something that has happened in the past. Most events are reflections of the past or at least bring back the same feelings as those of the past. New relationships develop and characters begin to bond, as they understand more about each other's past. Also, in this chapter, we waver off Jane for a while and ponder more on Mr. Rochester. Up till now, everything was about Jane. At the beginning of the chapter, Mr Rochester told Jane about Ad�le's past and how she came into this world. He tells her passionately and vividly about his past love and how she betrayed him. This shows the relationship between Jane and Mr. Rochester developing as he opens up to her. He is being friendlier towards her. ...read more.

Middle

Rochester mysteriously catches on fire, Jane came to the rescue. This again, brings up Jane's brave nature and her selflessness. Mr. Rochester is grateful for Jane and holds on to her for a little while. We also see that Mr. Rochester cares a lot about his status, as he does not want Jane to get Mrs. Fairfax. This shows the more selfish side of Mr. Rochester as later, he does not even give Jane credit for saving his life. More suspense is built because of what Jane heard before Mr. Rochester caught on fire. All fingers point to Grace Poole because of the "goblin-laughter" that sounded a lot like the one of the deranged and odd maid. Could this be a possible murder attempt? Or was Jane just hearing things? This chapter brings in Grace, the quiet maid who only came up once till this chapter. Was she trying to kill Mr. Rochester? A new side of this quiet character is brought into the story, changing the genre from quiet romance to a dark mystery. ...read more.

Conclusion

go on from there, things take a turn making you as the reader want to read on to find out why and how. But then things take another turn, turning it back to a love story as Mr. Rochester and Jane have their 'moment'. After Mr. Rochester's incident, Jane, being led on, cannot go back to sleep. Jane thinks about the past incident. She begins to realise her growing love for Mr Rochester and how if they did get together, their relationship would not be smooth and easy. But instead of realising what an odd couple they would make, she allows herself to be carried into her little world of dreams, showing again her foolish side. So to conclude, we could say that chapter 15 is a pivotal chapter because of the plot, characters, relationships, genres and themes and how they have developed through the chapter. They go through a series of events that build up to stronger bonds and relationships. Jane matures and falls in love and all fingers point to Grace Poole for the possible murder of Mr. Rochester. Things take a turn from a happier genre to a sad and mysterious genre. ...read more.

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