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Chapter 7 of Brams Stoker's Dracula seems to be a pivotal chapter in the overall novel due to the arrival of Dracula on to Whitby. The chapter is split up into three different sections each from a different viewpoint and

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Introduction

"What is the function of chapter 7? Explain how the techniques that Stoker uses are typical of his style elsewhere in the novel" Chapter 7 of Brams Stoker's Dracula seems to be a pivotal chapter in the overall novel due to the arrival of Dracula on to Whitby. The chapter is split up into three different sections each from a different viewpoint and in a different format. Firstly there is the newspaper cutting which goes into detail on the events that occurred leading up to the ships arrival on the shore. Following that came the Log of the Demeter written by the captain himslef as he saw the events take place on board. Finally the chapter ends with another entry into Mina's journal. It is important to note that while all three are very unique in their own ways, there is one common link between them all and that is the fact that all three are written in a format which strictly follows Stoker's techniques in previous chapters of the novel in which he adds authenticity to the oevrall story by writing it in different viewpoints of people who were actually there in amongst the surroundings and the plot. ...read more.

Middle

the few things that every person knows and experiences and would therefore be familiar with the message and ideas that Stoker is trying to get across. Another trend that begins to appear is the frequent links that stoker makes to previous figures in history, most famously in chapter 3 where he mentions "Attila and the Huns" while in chapter 7 the significance of the ships name is apparent since Demeter was a Greek goddess invoked as the "bringer of seasons" and therefore fits in perfectly with the arrival of Dracula and "death". In the captains log, the previous standard form of private journals that are quite personal is strayed away from and the story is now told through a less impersonal viewpoint of the captain in his log book. This part of the story involves less emotion from the writer and resembles more of a list of events next to their date rather then a chapter of the novel. The captains lack of any real emotion is portrayed by his bluntness in saying "only self and mate and two hands left to work ship." ...read more.

Conclusion

Mina also worries about Lucy's ability to cope with current life situations with the repetition of 'sensitive' and 'sweet'. One such instance is during the funeral when Lucy is troubled by the Dog's behaviour and this is a very vital scene as not only does it relate to Draculas ethinity with dogs but throughout the novel animal imagery is used as a motif in this case causing an eery atmosphere and again building up the tension towards the end of the chapter. Overall, I feel chapter 7 plays a vital role in developing the plot so that the reader can clearly see the changes in Whitby from Draculas arrival, from the newspaper cut out of the 'mystery of the sea' it can be seen that this is the only time the public and outside world have gotten really involved as previously the novel was told through journals and therefore must signify something significant is about to take place. Other changes shown are the sudden change in Lucy's behaviour and probably most significantly the death of Mr Swayles, indicating probable future events. ...read more.

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