• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Chapter five is the pivotal point in the book, it's the point when Frankenstein creates the monster and his actions set off what's about to happen throughout the book.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Frankenstein Mary Shelley was a British novelist. Her father was a political philosopher and her mother was also a philosopher and a feminist. Her mother dies whilst she was a baby so she and her half-sister were raised by her father. As the daughter of a political philosopher she was exposed to many of his theories. In 1814 she began a romantic relationship with one of her father's political followers. She continued her relationship with Percy Shelley although he was married and later became pregnant with his child - for which they were ostracised - however their prematurely born daughter died. Later when Percy's wife committed suicide they married, and it was in Geneva, Switzerland that Mary Shelley came up with the idea for Frankenstein. Chapter five is the pivotal point in the book, it's the point when Frankenstein creates the monster and his actions set off what's about to happen throughout the book. It's where he chooses to reject the monster and so trigger the monsters hate for Frankenstein. On the night that the monster is brought to life the language used creates a setting that foreshadows what's about to happen. ...read more.

Middle

This could be a materialistic representation of the good inside the monster that even though as a whole he is not beautiful there is a deeper beauty, which would make the reader feel more sympathetic toward the creature. However it could also be that these features are there purely to contrast and therefore concentrate the readers attention on the ugliness of the creature. The description of the monster also seems to change with frankenstein's feelings toward the creature. As he is creating the creature he claims to have 'selected his features as beautiful' but as it comes to life the creature is described to be a hideous monster. Shelley uses ambiguity in the creature's actions when she says "he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grim wrinkled his cheeks." The meaning of this can change with the readers' perception, some will see it as an act of vengeance, whilst others may see it as the monster reaching out towards Frankenstein. An important thing to remember is that the monster has only just been created and has yet to learn how to speak, so the mutterings could be that of a new-born baby learning to talk. ...read more.

Conclusion

However you could argue that his reasoning for creating life was completely selfish and he only thought of himself never having to suffer. I think that Frankenstein is about the rejection of the unusual, and the superficial nature of humans. The treatment of the monster shows this as he is constantly shunned from society because of what he is and the way he looks. Frankenstein has an underplayed message of feminism, as the women in the story are perceived as good, smart and well-grounded people unlike the men who are shown as weak. A good example is when Justine faces her death sentence, she handles it with grace whilst Frankenstein stands by and watches her die because he is afraid of how people will view him. Mary Shelley's mother was a famous feminist which may have affected her view of women. It's possible that the book is an autobiography of sorts. Mary Shelley can relate to both Frankenstein and the monster as she was ostracised for her actions and was seemingly surrounded by death for much of her life. I really enjoyed this book, and loved that it was such a feminist book for its time. I also enjoyed its portrayal of the monster and how people treat him. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Mary Shelley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

****
A good GCSE essay - accurate use of appropriate technical vocabulary and some excellent analysis of language. The main strength of this essay is the writer's ability to look at alternative interpretations of the language and discuss both sides with perception and insight.
Some good contextual detail but an abrupt and disappointing conclusion.

Marked by teacher Katie Dixon 29/04/2012

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Mary Shelley essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    With Relation to social/historical context, how does Mary Shelley explore the theme of monstrosity ...

    4 star(s)

    The creature did not pose a threat; furthermore he was confused and helpless. This line suggests that the creature was fairly friendly, rather than demonical: '...while a grin wrinkled his cheeks'. The creature was very similar to a new born baby, with no experience in life and no knowledge of

  2. Marked by a teacher

    How does Mary Shelley make the description of the monster waking in chapter five ...

    3 star(s)

    This creates tension, as we do not yet know whether the creature is alive, and so far it is not the incredible perfect human that Frankenstein was hoping for. However, we can tell by the sentence that something is wrong with the monster and the experiment might have failed.

  1. How does Mary Shelley create sympathy for the monster in "Frankenstein"?

    He is responsive to nature all around him, innocent and not born evil. He cannot understand why the old man in the hut is so frightened of him and runs away across the fields. Left alone he is enchanted 'by the simple dwelling place and is unaware that he has done wrong by stealing the old man's food.

  2. Frankenstein - Chapter 5 starts with 'It was on a dreary night of November', ...

    in mind that Frankenstein must keep moving because he is under the stress of the rain. The last sentence says 'my heart palpitated in sickness of fear,' This is sort of a gothic reference because Mary Shelly uses the word 'sickness,' and 'fear,' also when Mary Shelly wrote 'irregular steps,'

  1. Look at the significance of chapter five to the novel as a whole. Focus ...

    Childbirth was the most common cause of death among women and most infants never reached maturity. Mary had experienced more death than most during her life: her mother died during childbirth (the guilt of which haunted her for her entire life); her sister, Fanny, committed suicide (Mary blamed herself for

  2. Discuss the nature of monsters in Frankenstein and Beowulf.

    The character of Victor Frankenstein can be seen as a good man who becomes a monster. He starts the novel as a gentle student at Ingolstadt University. He is caring and wrote to his family everyday. This is until he started creating the Monster, then he forgot all about them.

  1. Frankenstein's Monster: Monster or victim

    In the novel there are five narratives, two from Walton, two from Victor and one from the creature itself. The first from Walton is an epistolary narrative where he relates to his sister "Victor's tale". The second is Victor narrating directly to Walton, onboard the ship about his life and how he made the creature.

  2. Chapter 5 in Frankenstein is a pivotal moment in the novel because it is ...

    This is the chapter in which the whole story is based around and actually gets the reader hooked onto it. As soon as you start reading the chapter you notice that there is a use of pathetic fallacy, ?It was on a dreary night of November.? Mary Shelley has quite

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work