• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Characters in the play

Extracts from this document...


Characters in the play Josie- Josie has the most speech in the play and is ultimately the most noticeable and interesting character of them all. She is loud, brash, confident and unashamed at wearing the most outrageous outfits! Being the youngest of the characters she has a lot of her life ahead of her, but without a job, an abusive German boyfriend and a son in Borstal she constantly turns up at the baths with a outrageous and sometimes shocking story to tell. Right from the very moment we meet her it is evident that she has a lot to say. Josie takes great pride in her sex life, and has aspirations to work in a strip club, as her obvious impatience would not allow her to be tied down with a 9 to 5! When first reading the script we found Josie's character horrifying yet exciting. She is the character with least shame and we really wanted to let that be known through her body language. All the other characters seem to be used to her incredible way of life but we wanted to shock the audience and really put forward the themes that come out of her monologues, such as abuse and poverty. ...read more.


As she is around the same age as Josie we wanted to provide a distinct comparison between the two. We didn't want to make Dawn appear completely stupid and dependent on her mother, as although she is a very comical character, it is not something we wanted to use just to gain a laugh. Jane- Jane is a friend of Nancy's from school but has been visiting the baths for a lot longer. A divorcee with a young son, Jane has gone back to university to study Islamic history. Although from the same social class as Nancy, with the same schooling and coming from a "good home", she lives off a grant and without the income of a male, like the majority of women that visits the baths. This is a point of aggravation for her and much of her speech revolves around the men in her life, past and present. She has a very clear opinion of what she thinks about men and isn't afraid to voice it, perhaps being the most feministic of all the women. She is certain of what she wants in life but is also very sensitive, particularly about her past. ...read more.


process I realised that the qualities she has, and the fact that she appears in such way in the text was in fact deliberate. It was challenging having to play someone who I couldn't relate to atal, despite being cast for the role because I was thought appropriate for it! I did many things to develop Nancy as a character. I focused on getting into her shoes, literally, by practising her walk and pyhsicalisation through the act. For example, when she first enters she is full on confidence and walks with an heir of confidence but this is destroyed by nasty glances from Josie and as time goes on through this scene her body language is very closed. I had to concentrate on making her voice very posh and so watched television shoes to acquire this. I used staneslaski techniques such as breaking down the objectives of lines such as when talking of her finaical status to going on to telling Josie that her husband left her. These 2 topics, although said in the same conversation depicted a very different mood and feeling from her. I used emotion memory when talking about her husband to gain a sense of sadness, concentrating on ordeals from my own life that stirred these emotions. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Charlotte Bronte section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Charlotte Bronte essays

  1. Literary Theory Essay 2: Feminism

    Hence in literature, whether or not the heroine supports or challenges this convention of "the marriage market" (for example, by marrying outside her social class, as Shirley Keeldar does in Charlotte Bronte's Shirley), it can be observed that within nineteenth century literature, women were portrayed as being solely defined by

  2. Prologue - Keith Johnson was a short man with close, iron-grey hair, and the ...

    A few more wriggles, and they saw the small mansion with its 10 rooms. While Richard got into position, the rest of the team edged sideways for a forced entrance through the side. Their black casuals camouflaged themselves against the dark lawn.

  1. Explain how a post-colonial analysis of any text on this module can illuminate the ...

    What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell: it grovelled, seemingly, on all fours; it snatched and growled like some strange wild animal: ...covered with clothing ...dark, grizzled hair...'. Bertha's bearing is left rather vague, neither human nor animal, there is a total

  2. Only a mother would know

    I rarely talk to her and find it hard to talk about anything other than the playgroup and our daughters' habits. We walked to her flat where she invited me for a cup of tea. Out of politeness I accepted, to be honest I didn't feel the need to have

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work