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Chips with Everything - Corporal Hill

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Introduction

Chips with Everything James Birchall 11G Corporal Hill Hill is a professional airman and sometimes represents a typical aggressive N.C.O. (Non-commissioned Officer). A typical N.C.O is aggressive; this is to gain respect from his recruits from the start. At the start of the play, he enrols in his character by shouting and making himself known as a person who expects discipline, "when I ask a question, I expect an answer..., is that understood!" After he makes this statement he gets a positive answer, "Yes corporal!" he has now got the discipline from the group. Yet he is a strangely contradictory character as one minute he is telling the new conscripts, "I never smile and I never joke," the next he is remembering the last bunch of recruits fondly, "We 'ad bags o' fun o' it." He then goes on to say " I will tear and mercilessly scratch the scorching daylights out of anyone who smarts the alec with me - and we've got some ere". The words here proves what kind of a character he is, he demands respect and from the words used here it seems he is a powerful character. ...read more.

Middle

He therefore sees the conscripts as targets, which can be easily influenced and made to join sides with him. Consequently, the generals see him as a threat, and believe that if you can't beat them, join them. Therefore, in order to 'break' Pip, the RAF would force him to become an officer. Also, because Pip and the generals come from very similar backgrounds (the upper class), the RAF wanted to avoid severe punishment, such as the punishment given to Smiler in order to break him, Wing C.o.: "I don't want a legal foot put wrong - I just want him broken in." However, because Pip is like a king among the lower class people, "Power, isn't it?... here among the yobs... you could be king. KING." he will not be broken easily, "I will not be an officer!" Strangely, when he is broken, his power spans over the conscripts and the officers, "Corporal Hill, you won't touch a single one of them." In fact, here we see Pip changing Corporal Hill's orders from the PO right in front of him: PO "Do you hear me, Corporal, this whole hut is under arrest." ...read more.

Conclusion

In this next appearance in the play, you can see straight away that the wing commander does not like conscripts, the comment which makes this obvious (as well as the attitude towards them) is, "Undisciplined hooligans!" and he looks down on them for their common background, "look at them...the good old working class of England". The wing commander can be described as disapproving, impatient, intolerant. He prefers efficiency to that of learning and understanding, "a meteor, fully armed, is more important than a library." He encourages conflict within family, not harmony, "we are never at peace. The human being is at a constant state of war and we must be prepared, against each other." So again his character stands out to be one full of hatred and I feel that due to his rank he has lived through many wars and so his view would have changed. He is now driven to believe in a constant conflict; this has now driven out any peace which was left. Overall the wing commander is very dedicated to his work and is now dependent on it. He can't go back to society as he has grown to despise them and now the RAF is his home and his children are his conscripts. His attitude is hatred and he promotes war and now that is all he knows. ...read more.

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