• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Choose a novel or short story in which the lives of characters are disrupted for good or for bad by some person or force.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Choose a novel or short story in which the lives of characters are disrupted for good or for bad by some person or force. In the Cone Gatherers by Robin Jenkins the lives of the two main characters, Calum and Neil, two Cone Gatherers who have been sent to the forest of Ardmore to work during the war effort, are disrupted for bad by Duror, the evil gamekeeper. The book focuses on Duror's evil towards the two cone gatherers. This evil is described in chapter 8 as " a presence like air, infecting everyone". From the start of the book, Duror's cold evil is made very clear. "Duror the gamekeeper, in an icy sweat of hatred". This refers to one of the opening images when Calum, who loves nature and everything about it, bends over to pity a rabbit caught in the gamekeeper's trap. It says that Duror keeps his gun targeting the "hunchback" whilst Calum is bent over. ...read more.

Middle

Before he spoke to Effie Morton about what he had supposedly seen, his conscience comes in to play and he wonders whether he should spread these vicious rumors. In the end he goes ahead with it and tells Effie, Lady Runcie-Campbell's cook, that Calum is a pervert who exposes himself in the forest. An example of this is in Chapter 4 when the author says "now when he was going to lie again, this time knowing it would implicate evil, he felt that he was about to commit before her eyes an obscene gesture, such as he had falsely accused the dwarf of making." Before he tells Lady Runcie-Campbell of this alledged sighting, they talk abut the forthcoming deer drive. Duror suggests to her that the cone gatherers should be used as beaters. She rang the cone gatherers boss, Mr Tulloch and asked if they could be spared and he asked if it was necessary since Calum was sensitive about issues such as hunting and Duror told her to say that they were necessary. ...read more.

Conclusion

In chapter 14 everyone realises that what Duror has been saying about Calum is just viscous slander and untrue. Calum is too simple to understand what they are meaning. The final chapter tells of Durors eventual insanity. Lady Runcie-Campbell's son, Roderick gets stuck up a tree and the cone gatherers will only help him if Lady Runcie-Campbell comes down and asks them herself. When she heard this she did as they said and when she arrived she saw Calum's dead body, with a smile on his face, hanging from one of the trees. The next thing she heard was a gunshot and she turned round to see that Duror had shot himself. I think that Duror had killed Calum because he was irritated that they had asked Lady Runcie-Campbell to request their help herself. Then when he had realised what he had done he knew that he couldn't live with himself so he committed suicide. He had disrupted Neil's life by killing his brother, who he loved and had more than disrupted Calum;s life - he had ended it. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Macbeth section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work