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Choose any one scene from Romeo and Juliet, which highlights the question of love and loyalty - How would it be staged to bring out the important ideas?

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Introduction

By Nikhil Shah Choose any one scene from Romeo and Juliet, which highlights the question of love and loyalty. How would it be staged to bring out the important ideas? In the play Romeo and Juliet (by William Shakespeare), I will be staging the fifth Scene of Act 1. Arguably, this scene is the most crucial point in the play, as this is where they both meet, and their love and loyalties divide between them and their families. This scene displays how the love of both Romeo and Juliet from different parties confronts divided loyalties for them, as they either have to be loyal to their families or to each other, but not both as the two loyalties are in direct conflict with each other, being from each others enemy's party. They display they love and are loyalty to each other by what is said, 'My only love sprung from my only hate', this was said by Juliet after finding out that Romeo was a Montague (divided loyalties). ...read more.

Middle

to see why he is sad, and he explains how he is in love with a girl who does not love him back, but this is only an infatuation as he only speaks of her beauty i.e. 'What doth her beauty serve as a note.' Benvolio tries to persuade him to forget about her and that the cure is to look out some other fine looking girls. Romeo refuses, again showing loyalty to his 'so-called' love. Here, at first, there will be dim lights, to express Romeo's infatuation but gradually get lighter. This part will be quite slow though it is a short bit. Later that day, by coincidence a servant appears asking them a question, and they find out a party is being held that evening, one that is of Capulets. Romeo reluctantly goes with Benvolio and Mercutio (friend) to the party, and he meets Juliet, daughter of Capulet, and falls in love. ...read more.

Conclusion

Staging wise, I will put a spot light on the both of them while they are talking of their love, emphasising the importance of their love and loyalty at this crucial point. Tybalt (Capulet) hears Romeo's voice and recognises it immediately, he is angered and tries to start a fight but told not to by Capulet himself. Tybalt expresses blinded loyalty but never the less loyalty as he wants to chuck Romeo out, being the enemy, as he sees it as an insult 'gate crashing' the party. He displays when he tells Capulet 'It fits when such a villain is a guest: I'll not endure him.' Capulet tells him not to, he does this out of fear of the prince carrying out the threat he made and also out of loyalty as the prince has a lot of control. During the party, the lights will be dim, and dance music will be played. This scene will be very lively in the scene there will be a crowd, and lots of things going on, apart from when Romeo and Juliet are talking. ...read more.

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