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Choose one scene from "The Crucible" that you consider being particularly dramatic, exciting or tense. Explain your choice and discuss the importance of this scene to the play as a whole.

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Introduction

Choose one scene from "The Crucible" that you consider being particularly dramatic, exciting or tense. Explain your choice and discuss the importance of this scene to the play as a whole. McCarthyism is the term describing a period, 1940s and 50s, when the USA was obsessed with a fear of communists secretly trying to destroy the American way of life. During this period thousands of Americans were accused of communism and were put on trial, they were asked about their personal lives, friends and political beliefs. They were persuaded to pass on names of communists then they could go free. This is much like the Salem witch trials when each of the accused witches were trialed and if they told the court a name of another person they were no longer accused. ...read more.

Middle

When Elizabeth enters she is made to stand alone. This distance between the characters is symbolic of the distance in their relationship. At this point Elizabeth is standing alone facing Danforth. This is an extremely tense point in the play because Elizabeth is in control of John's fate. Elizabeth keeps trying to look at John for a sign. She starts to pause a lot because she still hasn't made her mind up about what she is going to say. This is very tense for the audience because they know what she should say but Elizabeth doesn't, this is called dramatic irony. Danforth starts to get angry because Elizabeth keeps glancing at John but Danforth says "The answer is in your memory and you need no help to give it to me". ...read more.

Conclusion

At this point Elizabeth is equiverating and starts to struggle. Danforth ask Elizabeth outright "To you own knowledge, has John Proctor ever committed the crime of lechery!" Danforth's anger is shown by not having a question mark just an exclamation mark. This is the climax of the play because Elizabeth now has to give a proper answer and the audience will find out what Elizabeth is going to say. Elizabeth answers (faintly)"No,sir" shows us that Elizabeth still loves John and we find out that John will be hanged, this stage action shows that she was reluctant to say no. After this John tells her to tell the truth and before the door is shut Elizabeth realises that she has done the wrong thing and says "Oh, god!" John's fate is now sealed but he tries to protest but this has not effect on Sanford's decision that John will be hanged. Cameron Taylor-Salmon 11RKD ...read more.

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