• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Choose three sonnets, which have made a strong impression on you and explain they have achieved this impression?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

English Coursework Choose three sonnets, which have made a strong impression on you and explain they have achieved this impression? The three sonnets I have chosen to use are, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" by William Shakespeare "How do I love thee? Let me count the ways" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning "Since brass, nor stone, nor boundless sea" also by William Shakespeare. I have chosen these three sonnets because I think they all convey undying, untouchable love and yet they are all described in such different ways but somehow have the same effect. "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" Shakespeare starts this sonnet with a question and all through the sonnet seems to linger on the answer instead of answering strait away. He starts the sonnet by asking himself a rhetorical question in which he compares her beauty with the most beautiful natural thing such as summer before he goes on to answer his rhetorical question as if saying why or why not. However throughout the first two quatrains he seems to explain that she is, "more lovely and more temperate" and "And summer's lease hath all too short a date:" carries on by writing ...read more.

Middle

In all three quatrains a question occurs and all questions are answered before the sonnet meets its end. "How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea, whose action is no stronger than a flower?" This question is referring to beauty, love and mortality. Shakespeare is asking if beauty and love can defeat mortality, if love and beauty can still stand out during such a rage and goes on to answer this question through the sonnet. The second quatrain talks about time and strength, it gives few examples of strong elements but then goes on to say that all these elements can be defeated by time and no matter how strong, they can't last forever. The third quatrains first line starts with a juxtaposition before going on to sorrow, "O fearful meditation, where alack," the juxtaposition is of the fearful meditation, its showing us the opposite meaning of meditation as meditation is supposed to be peaceful and not meant to be feared. The rest of this quatrain talks of death ever coming and talks of beauty again and saying maybe beauty can defy time as long as it is hidden but then time becomes personified as it says, "Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back, Or who spoil o'er beauty can forbid?" ...read more.

Conclusion

He uses summer for "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" and for "Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea" he uses strong natural elements. In the final couplet of each sonnet he uses his sonnets as an explanation of how things will last forever. In both sonnets he describes death as if it is a living-breathing thing. In "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" Shakespeare speaks of death as if it is ready to claim a life in the shadows. But in "Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea" Shakespeare personifies death using words such as "hand" and "foot". "Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade," (Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?) "Or what strong hand can hold his swift foot back". (Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea). Both sonnets are more about time than love and both describe things that are overcome by time and yet love can defeat time, if the love is strong enough. "O how shall summer's honey breath holds out, against the wreckful siege of batt'ring days"(Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea). These two lines are probably talking about how something so sweet and pure can stay standing after something so forceful. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Comparisons section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Comparisons essays

  1. How do Donne's sonnets differ from Shakespeare's sonnets? In your answer, you should discuss ...

    easily associate summer as having "too short a date" or having its "gold complexion dimmed". In his sonnets, Donne writes much more powerfully than Shakespeare. He starts off with the phrases "Batter my heart" and "Death be not proud" which are commanding phrases.

  2. Compare the presentation of relationships in "My Last Duchess", "Porphyria's Lover" and "The Laboratory".

    This is vital; because through their relationship the reader learns that the Duke is planning to re-marry and is in the process of choosing himself a new wife, "his fair daughter's self, as I avowed at starting, is my object".

  1. Compare the ways in which London is Portrayed by William Wordsworth and William Blake

    Moreover, the use of the ABAB rhyme scheme also holds further importance to the way in which Blake has written the poem; with the rhyming it allows Blake to express his strong anger and grief much more easily: "Man...ban", "fear....hear", "curse....hearse", thus, the use of the rhyming scheme ensures that

  2. comparing John Dryden(TM)s The Fire of Lond

    We learn in the next few lines that it is not only humans who are effected by the volcano 'wild birds... did flutter on the ground and flap their useless wings,' here Byron uses a sense of inversion to display how much the disaster is affecting everything that becomes to

  1. Poems Coursework

    The word 'garment' shows that this positive image of London is under a cover and can/will show change in the near future. On the other hand, in the poem 'London', William Blake drums in his personal views on the architecture of the city.

  2. By comparing 'The Collar' and 'Holy Sonnet', discuss how the poets show the difficulties ...

    Throughout his poem Herbert repeats the phrase 'I will abroad', the phrase in itself emphasising Herbert's wish to leave the constrictions of God. The repetition accentuates his determination to do this and to do it alone. Donne instead uses language like 'I...labour to admit you...to no end.'

  1. Pre 1914 Prose Coursework

    The long draughty subetterean passage inside the castle was chilly and dusty. The Red Room is described also as a discomforting, scary place, where there had been previous incidents which had happened. Like the young duke who died, where he had fallen headlong down the steps.

  2. COMPARISON:Browning's Sonnet 43 and Byron's So, Well Go No More A-Roving

    Things come to such a pass that the sword wants to be aloof from the scabbard (Byron makes a sexual undertone by using the words sword and sheath). The lines ?For? Sheath? and ?And? breast? are beautiful for symbolic and figurative imagery.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work