• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Choose two contrasting scenes from, ‘Journeys End’, which you feel effectively present the themes of guilt and remorse. Analyze their effectiveness as drama.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Choose two contrasting scenes from, 'Journeys End', which you feel effectively present the themes of guilt and remorse. Analyze their effectiveness as drama. For this piece of work I am trying to show some of the emotions men go through when faced with the horrers of war; this is often shown in the forms of guilt and remorse. I am looking to analyze the relationship between Raleigh and Stanhope and how their comradeship is damaged by the pressures and struggles of war. This will be shown in the way the two scenes present the issues and then in the way that they contrast. The first of the two scenes I have chosen to use for this piece of work is the scene midway throughout the second act when Stanhope, riddled with alcohol, struggles to control his anger when Raleigh attempts to send off a letter. The second scene, I have chosen is the end scene, which shows Raleigh, after being wounded, with Stanhope at his side. ...read more.

Middle

'Don't 'Dennis' me! Stanhope's my name! You're not at school. Go and inspect your rifles' This scene shows what the war has done to Stanhope as a person. He feels that Raleigh has a duty to his sister to inform her of the type of person he has become and of his degraded personality. He feels this because he is so horrified as to what he has become, this is shown when he says, 'oh God, I cant read the blasted thing!' which shows us that he fears the contents. These aspects show his psychological deterioration as a result of the war. Raleigh is shocked and possibly doesn't understand why Stanhope has changed so much because of the war, this is once more illustrated in the scenes proceeding Osborne's death. The scene then continues to read out Raleigh's letter and to find that the content is the complete opposite to what Stanhope expected. ...read more.

Conclusion

Here Stanhope is covering up the seriousness of Raleigh's injury. There is none of the earlier tension in Stanhope's words or voice. Instead his comments are aimed at keeping Raleigh calm and offering comfort.'(Rising) sure! I'll bring a candle and get another blanket'. It is in what is not said that we can see the men are now, finally, at ease with each other. The broken lines of Raleigh's words reveal his pain and confusion, 'But I-I cant go home just for-for a knock'. The stage directions encourage the sense of sadness and stillness in the dugout in spite of the war raging outside, ' Again there was silence in the dugout. Avery faint light is beginning...' The final scene is poignant because of all the emotions that have gone before it. Stanhope is now losing his friend and needs to show his sorrow for what has passed by staying with him to the end. For the first time in the play he puts his duty second ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE RC Sheriff section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE RC Sheriff essays

  1. Horror And Futility In Journeys End

    this was because he 'understood everything'.His journey begins with how Stanhope 'looked splendid' and 'how frightfully quiet it is'.However, it ends with how 'frightfully dark and cold' it is.These two explanations of the atmosphere in the dugout contrast each other and show how over time, Raleigh's opinion of the trenches changes.

  2. Journeys End Drama Studies

    The silences in the slightly broken conversation also add to the tension because each silence makes the audience more confident that Stanhope is not happy about Raleigh's appearance. Stanhope also uses very short sentences, these make him seem very snappy and unwilling to talk.

  1. 20th Century Drama - Journey's End, R C Sheriff

    The young lad gives the commanding officer a letter to home. To Raleigh's surprise he learns from Stanhope that all letters must be censored. "Oh, I-I didn't realise that. (He stands embarrassed; then gives a short laugh.) I-I think-I'll just leave it, then.

  2. Compare and Contrast the Presentation of the Psychological Effects of the WarAnd the Setting ...

    intimate setting due to the restrictions of the set, and Hill having conveyed Hilliard's emotional state in a variety of locations, which she was free to do as a novelist using the third person. Barton in 'Strange Meeting' parallels Raleigh in 'Journey's End', as both are young, relatively na�ve and

  1. How Does Journey's End Explore The Different Ways That Men React To War ...

    the trenches so that he has more of a connection with them and will reduce the amount of tension in the trenches. In trying to develop his own ways of dealing with war he increases the amount of stress and tension in the dug out because he angers Stanhope by eating with the men instead of the officers.

  2. Journey's End

    Oh, I say, but damn it! This quotation shows that Mason was taken for granted: Osborne: We must have pepper. It's a disinfectant. Trotter: You must have pepper in soup! Stanhope: (quietly) why wasn't it packed, Mason? Mason: It - it was missed, sir.

  1. An exploration of the changing relationship between Stanhope and Raleigh and how it develops ...

    I see. Rather a coincidence" with a nervous laugh, as if Raleigh doesn't know what to expect next. It's also obvious that Stanhope's quick, short sentences are intended to be ironic. However, the short sentences could also be a sign of his suppressed anger towards Raleigh, as if Stanhope believes

  2. Free essay

    Why is Journey's End Popular?

    When Stanhope raises his voice, Osborne intervenes and says "Good heavens Stanhope" and tries to calm him down. Osborne is a very sensible man and I think that after his death, Stanhope would have found it difficult to cope without his former second in command.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work