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Choose two contrasting scenes from, ‘Journeys End’, which you feel effectively present the themes of guilt and remorse. Analyze their effectiveness as drama.

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Introduction

Choose two contrasting scenes from, 'Journeys End', which you feel effectively present the themes of guilt and remorse. Analyze their effectiveness as drama. For this piece of work I am trying to show some of the emotions men go through when faced with the horrers of war; this is often shown in the forms of guilt and remorse. I am looking to analyze the relationship between Raleigh and Stanhope and how their comradeship is damaged by the pressures and struggles of war. This will be shown in the way the two scenes present the issues and then in the way that they contrast. The first of the two scenes I have chosen to use for this piece of work is the scene midway throughout the second act when Stanhope, riddled with alcohol, struggles to control his anger when Raleigh attempts to send off a letter. The second scene, I have chosen is the end scene, which shows Raleigh, after being wounded, with Stanhope at his side. ...read more.

Middle

'Don't 'Dennis' me! Stanhope's my name! You're not at school. Go and inspect your rifles' This scene shows what the war has done to Stanhope as a person. He feels that Raleigh has a duty to his sister to inform her of the type of person he has become and of his degraded personality. He feels this because he is so horrified as to what he has become, this is shown when he says, 'oh God, I cant read the blasted thing!' which shows us that he fears the contents. These aspects show his psychological deterioration as a result of the war. Raleigh is shocked and possibly doesn't understand why Stanhope has changed so much because of the war, this is once more illustrated in the scenes proceeding Osborne's death. The scene then continues to read out Raleigh's letter and to find that the content is the complete opposite to what Stanhope expected. ...read more.

Conclusion

Here Stanhope is covering up the seriousness of Raleigh's injury. There is none of the earlier tension in Stanhope's words or voice. Instead his comments are aimed at keeping Raleigh calm and offering comfort.'(Rising) sure! I'll bring a candle and get another blanket'. It is in what is not said that we can see the men are now, finally, at ease with each other. The broken lines of Raleigh's words reveal his pain and confusion, 'But I-I cant go home just for-for a knock'. The stage directions encourage the sense of sadness and stillness in the dugout in spite of the war raging outside, ' Again there was silence in the dugout. Avery faint light is beginning...' The final scene is poignant because of all the emotions that have gone before it. Stanhope is now losing his friend and needs to show his sorrow for what has passed by staying with him to the end. For the first time in the play he puts his duty second ...read more.

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