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Chose 2 scenes in "Macbeth" which show the changing relationship between Macbeth and lady Macbeth although you should focus in detail on you chosen scenes you can refer to other relevant scenes

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Introduction

Chose 2 scenes in "Macbeth" which show the changing relationship between Macbeth and lady Macbeth although you should focus in detail on you chosen scenes you can refer to other relevant scenes As you read though the book you notice that Lady Macbeth and Macbeth's relationship is not very static. The first thing you notice about Lady Macbeth is that she despises Macbeth in a way that she thinks he is a weak man. An example of this is at the start of 1:5 "I fear thy nature; It is too full of thy milk of human kindness." This proves my point because she is saying she is worried that Macbeth is too kind and can't do anything manly or bad. One of Lady Macbeth's most important lines is 1:5 when she calls upon the evil spirits to unsex her "Come, you spirits that tend on mortal thoughts. ...read more.

Middle

Or he could say it in a very innocent way, or he could just be stating that's what time he thinks he's leaving. This line shows my point quite well and depending on what way you look at it, it could be deadly or just nothing. Macbeth is not a very concealed man and cannot lie very well and this is shown in the end of act 1 scene 5. Lady Macbeth says "your face, my thane, is a book where men may read strange matters." This means she can need him like a book. Also at the end of act 1 scene 5 Lady Macbeth gives Macbeth advice on keeping hidden it is a very important line and appears in many different forms later on in the play. "Look like th'inocnet flower but be the serpent under't." ...read more.

Conclusion

This is a great concern to Macbeth and this is proven later on when Macbeth sees the dead bloody ghost of Banquo. Macbeth finds it hard in places to forget about things, whereas Lady Macbeth doesn't get very bothered about things. This is shown in Act 3 scene 2 "things without all remedy should be without regard; what's done, is done." This is Lady Macbeth telling Macbeth to forget what is done and thin about the future. Macbeth finds his wife a trusting listener because in Act 3 scene 2 she is telling him to "be bright and jovial" but he is troubled and cannot "O full of Scorpions is my mind, Dear wife." This means he can confide in his wife with his problems. Macbeth obviously cares about his wife/husband because he wants to protect her from knowing too much "be innocent of the knowledge, dearest chuck, till though applaud the deed" so he obviously cares about her because he's not telling her so she's not caught up in it. ...read more.

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