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Close reference to act 3 scene 2 (the mouse trap)

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Introduction

Close reference to act 3 scene 2 (the mouse trap) In this scene we see Hamlet completely different to how he appears to us previously, as the "man of words only". Hamlet in the start of the scene explains to the actors of how to perform the play and keep it original and not to over act as that could give away the mere meaning of the play. This is the first time that we see Hamlet be organised about his plans of revenge. Hamlet calls the play a "mouse trap" he takes on the role of a revenger and is no longer passive. Hamlet starts of by attacking Ophelia with his strong insulting words. Later on he speaks up to Claudius and tells him that the play is called "the mouse trap" its his first hints to Claudius about revenge from him. ...read more.

Middle

"I'll take the ghosts word for a thousand pound" Later on Rosencrantz and Guildenstern come to tell Hamlet that the king is outrageous, he uses the word "choler" to describe him, at this point Hamlet at first tells them that maybe he is drunk and then talks about bringing in the doctors for him. The fact that Hamlet does not appear serious to them shows that Hamlet is enjoying the way Claudius is found guilty conscious as this relieves Hamlet from the previous thoughts he had and the double mind he was beginning to have. The significance of this scene to our understanding of the play as a whole and Hamlet the character in particular is very important. As we know that the theme of this play is a revenge tragedy we also know that from the previous understand of Hamlet shows him as the man of ...read more.

Conclusion

Hamlet is also angry with Claudius because he kills his father and takes the throne to himself when Hamlet has also been waiting for that powerful position. This whole factor gives Hamlet more encouragement for killing Claudius. This also shows us that Hamlet is aware that killing a King is the biggest crime in front of God and the people of Denmark, Hamlet would not just kill Claudius and take such a big step if it was only for his dead father, but in fact Hamlet has his own reasons for why he should kill Claudius and this brings the whole understanding of the play. In this scene any confusion that the audience may be in is cleared as Hamlet shows his true aims which affect the play as a whole. We see that Hamlet is also ambitious and this is one point that we didn't know by seeing the previous scenes of the play. ...read more.

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