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Communication in Of Mice And Men

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Introduction

In Of Mice and Men characters rarely communicate in a straightforward fashion and rely on gestures. They find it hard to express their feelings and can't talk to others about it. Nobody is related to each other so don't communicate much, except for George and Lennie. The best communication is between George and Lennie, because Lennie listens to what George says. They understand each other and get on well because they have good communication. Even though George and Lennie have the best communication in the whole book, George still doesn't tell Lennie some things. ...read more.

Middle

She can't tell the others that she is in a loveless marriage and can't socialise, because there's no more women in the ranch. Instead she just comes into the bunkhouse and talks to the men and she can't bear her lonely soul to the men around her and they think she is a mere woman. When Carlson was telling Candy to kill his old dog and put him out of his misery, Candy made excuses and changed the subject, because he loved his dog a lot. Candy can't admit his sentimental attachment to his dog and this lack of communication causes his dog to get killed. ...read more.

Conclusion

If George could've persuaded Curley that Lennie didn't mean to kill Curley's wife, then Lennie may have not had to be shot. Carlson doesn't understand why George is so upset after killing Lennie, he only sees him as the culprit and not a friend of George. The characters in Of Mice and Men leave there strongest feeling unstated throughout the novel. George can't tell Lennie how much he loves him, Candy can't tell Carlson how much he admires his dog and Crooks can't express how it feels to be humiliated because he is black. At the time in society there was the Great Depression due to lack of communication and this is also shown in the novel. ...read more.

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Response to the question

The candidate does discuss communication between the various characters but needs to go into more depth when discussing the characters response and emotions. My advice would be to go in to more detail when discussing each character. The candidate does ...

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Response to the question

The candidate does discuss communication between the various characters but needs to go into more depth when discussing the characters response and emotions. My advice would be to go in to more detail when discussing each character. The candidate does not use any quotations, this is essential in developing the essay and discussing how the characters communicate, which is the essay title.

Level of analysis

There is no discussion about the way in which any of the scenes are set and no mention of linguistic techniques such as the use of metaphors and similes etc. This type of analysis is required at this level of qualification. However s/he does attempt to discuss the reasoning behind the characters actions which shows a good level of understanding. In addition the candidate needs to add a conclusion, this should summarise key points, answer the initial question and include personal opinions and reasonings.

Quality of writing

Overall this is a reasonable essay, it flows well and there are only minor issues with both spelling and grammar. Unfortunately punctuation isn’t always used appropriately and the candidate lacks a good range of vocabulary.


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Reviewed by PicturePerfect 24/02/2012

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