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Compare act 2 scene 3 and act 3 scene 1 of William Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing".

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Introduction

Compare Act 2 Scene 3 and Act 3 Scene 1 of William Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing" During these two scenes, both Benedick and Beatrice are deceived into believing that the other loves them, set up by those closest to them. In one scene Leonato, Claudio and Don Pedro deceive Benedick, and in the other, Beatrice is fooled by Ursula and Hero. A basic ploy used throughout the conversation between Leonato, Claudio and Don Pedro, is that they make their words very loud and clear so as to make sure Benedick understands the situation fully. The men start their conversation by pointing out the best things about Beatrice; her wit, intelligence and so on. This makes Benedick feel that she, if he could love, would be a worthy lover of his affection. ...read more.

Middle

The overall effect of this scene proves to Benedick that Beatrice does love him, and makes him feel both more kindly and loving toward her as his interjections in the dialogue show. Though much shorter, the scene featuring Ursula and Hero still manages to fit many of the ploys used by the men into the conversation. They too question and then confirm the love that Benedick feels, point out the faults of Beatrice and make Benedick seem like a man she is lucky to have the admiration of. They even go so far as saying that he is "the man of Italy". There are differences between the two scenes though as in line 83 when Hero says that she will tell Benedick to "fight against his passion" because Beatrice does not know how to love. ...read more.

Conclusion

This tone and manner are soon forgotten though, as they conclude their talk by praising her "true judgement" and "swift and excellent wit", again to make the deceived feel far from deceived, quite the opposite in fact. Some people may believe that deception in whatever form, is a bad thing. It can be used to aid evil (as when Don John deceives Claudio about Hero, later in the play) and that though a good cause was behind the deception of Beatrice and Benedick, it was dishonest and immoral. If two people love each other, surely they do not need to be tricked into their love, but it will com naturally? I however agree with what Leonato, Claudio, Don Pedro, Ursula and Hero did. I would ask if the love is not there to begin with, how can a couple be tricked into it? Beatrice and Benedick's stubborn and proud characters got in the way of their love, and to remove this obstacle, the deception was needed. In the end ...read more.

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