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Compare and Contrast Baz Luhrmann's dramatisation of 'Romeo and Juliet', Act 2, Scene 2 with Franco Zeffirelli's version

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Introduction

Compare and Contrast Baz Luhrmann's dramatisation of 'Romeo and Juliet', Act 2, Scene 2 with Franco Zeffirelli's version In Baz Luhrmann's dramatisation, he breaks away from the traditional style of Romeo and Juliet and does a more modern, thrilling interpretation of the play. He tries to incorporate every day modern life issues to make the film more exciting, for example the scene with Mercutio as a transvestite, and how Romeo takes drugs before the Capulet party. Zeffirelli's version on the other hand has a completely different approach; it has more of a traditional Shakespeare style that all his plays are performed under. It is in Elizabethan times and is more true to the text than the Baz Luhrmann version. Luhrmann's characters are considerably changed from the traditional Shakespeare versions, here they are older than in the book, they are both at around 17 to 18 years old, and their knowledge is shown along with it, they seem to know more on sexual areas unlike Zeffirelli's: 'Or any other part belonging to a man' This is from Act two, Scene two where Juliet says this in a humorous manner as she is thinking of what this could be. ...read more.

Middle

The meeting of Romeo is very differently done in both versions. Zeffirelli's scene shows Romeo in the party dancing when he sees Juliet from across the hall, and this is shot from his perspective. As the next dance comes on, they spin around in a circle giving the impression that they are lost in each others love. After this is over, a sonnet comes on stage and the camera follows Romeo making his way over to Juliet. The sonnet is singing a piece foreseeing the future of the play, about the falling in love and death of a couple, giving the audience an idea of what is to come. In the Baz Luhrmann version we see a completely different approach to this. After taking drugs, Romeo goes out of control and we see him in the bathroom putting his face in a basin of water. He then looks in the fish tank, and suddenly sees Juliet through it, giving the scene a flirting romantic sense. In Zeffirelli's version of the play he shoots it from Romeo's perspective throughout the scene. ...read more.

Conclusion

In an over excited fashion he stumbles out of the place where he was listening to Juliet, showing he is not yet matured as all he has done so far was considered very ungentlemanly like. As they talk, Romeo climbs up a tree next to the balcony to get closer to Juliet, this is Zeffirelli showing us how love lust he is, climbing a tree late at night to reach her. Unlike Luhrmans there love is more immature, there conversation is more rushed and seems less though through unlike the older characters in Luhrmann's adaptation. As the scene ends, they have stayed with each other all night. As Romeo leaves Zeffirelli gets them to do the reach where David reaches out to god, showing there contact with each other. Luhrmann's modern adaptation is showing a side of Shakespeare that is not always seen, and it is assumed that it was originally performed as to the style in Zeffirelli's. Zeffirelli's is a more traditional timed one, true to text and shows a more classic approach to Romeo and Juliet giving the audience a passionate classic, Luhrmans is offering a more original picture. Luhrmans and Zeffirelli's are two completely different approaches of successfully showing play Romeo and Juliet. ...read more.

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