• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare and contrast Digging and Follower by Seamus Heaney. Which is the most successful poem in your opinion.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare and contrast "Digging" and "Follower" by Seamus Heaney. Which is the most successful poem in your opinion. Here we will analyse 2 poems by Seamus Heaney called "Digging" and "Follower". We will look at the similarities and differences between these poems. In both these poems Heaney puts emphasis on many subjects related to his life such as his childhood memories of growing up in Northern Ireland and the conflict there. His father also features strongly in both poems as a main influence on his life. We will be analysing the two poems form and content. The content of the poems reveals much about Heaney's life and by comparing the form and content of the two poems, we can uncover much about Heaney's feelings and style of writing. ...read more.

Middle

The poem goes into description about the ploughing of the land showing his father as an expert in this field, however, he is left unable to follow in his fathers footsteps and turns to writing instead. The similarities and differences of these poems are uncovered when the form and content is studied closely. If we start with the similarities in the content we can see many things and these similarities convey the continuation from Digging to Follower. Both contain childhood memories, mainly of his father and references to digging. In "Digging" we can see how he looks down on his father digging in the garden and this moment takes him back 20 years: "Till his straining rump among the flowerbeds bends low, comes up twenty years away" Here Heaney is reminiscing about the past and how his father used to be, digging for potatoes. ...read more.

Conclusion

As Heaney looks back on his childhood, he remembers every detail in his mind, following the actions in his head as he digs to remember it. Both these poems are revolved mainly around Heaney's father. In "Digging", his father is in the garden digging as he looks down: "My father, digging." He sees his father digging and he remembers how he used to watch him 20 years ago to the very same thing. The way his father digs is described in great detail as he remembers it in his head. It is possible that this is one of the few memories he has of his father from past times and this is why he remembers it so well. "Follower" is also based mainly on Heaney's father and his memories of him. In "Follower", Heaney follows his father around watching what he does taking note of everything as if he were to do this himself. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Seamus Heaney section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Seamus Heaney essays

  1. Compare and contrast the way Seamus Heaney and D.H Lawrence depict childhood feelings and ...

    The poem begins in a very harmonious situation - a complete contrast to Discord in childhood where the opening stanza sets the scene for the aggression to come. The harmony is symbolic of the close relationship between Lawrence and his mother.

  2. Compare And Contrast Seamus Heaney's Poems 'Digging' And 'Follower'.

    Some of the rhyme words used are, "sound / ground / down, suggesting strong rhyme. Generally the rhyming scheme used in 'Follower' is ABAB meaning the first line rhymes with the third. In 'Digging' the rhyming scheme in the beginning is AA BBB, but then the rhyme dies out since the rest of the poem doesn't fully rhyme.

  1. In his poems 'Follower and Digging' Heaney is thinking about his father. How do ...

    He did not have the skills to dig, that the men before him did. Seamus Heaney has used the repetition of the first and last verse. This suggests to the reader that what goes around comes. The younger generation cares for the older until the younger ones become the older generation.

  2. Comparing and contrasting "Digging" by Seamus Heaney, and "He was" by Richard Wilbur.

    It may be because turf cutters are no longer needed, thus the world is changing and "men like them" are no longer required. As there is a clear link between Ireland and digging turfs, it is as though his grandfather represents the best of his country in his skillful work

  1. Compare the ways in which Heaney presents family feelings in 'Digging' and 'Follower'

    This is hinted by the large amount of marine-type words used in the poem, such as "Dipping and rising" like a ship out in the sea. "Mapping the furrow" which could be compared to someone carefully navigating a ship, which is confirmed with the following word "exactly".

  2. Compare and contrast Childhood by John Clare and Follower by Seamus Heaney

    In the first stanza he refers to his school, in the second stanza he mentions animal pens where he used to play, in the third stanza he mentions some of the animals. In the fourth stanza he refers to exploring over meadows, the fifth stanza tells us of the games

  1. Compare And Contrast Seamus Heaney's Poems 'Digging' And 'Follower'.

    The idea of freshly ploughed soil, adds to the readers view of the country side as a beautiful place and so country life is also portrayed as something happy. 'Digging' and 'Follower' differ in their structures as 'Digging' consists of a much looser structure than Follower.

  2. After reading the two poems Digging and Follower, discuss the relationship that Heaney writes ...

    Enjambment is used to keep the rhythm of the poem continuously flowing and to keep the readers in the frame of the poem. Enjambment is also used to show that the poem is digging further into his memories. Heaney liked harsh and blunt sounds such as "lug", "coarse", "nestled" and "heaving sods".

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work