• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare and Contrast how Mercutio is Portrayed in the Baz Luhrman and the Franco Zefferelli Productions of Romeo and Juliet Focusing on Act 3 Scene 1

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare and Contrast how Mercutio is Portrayed in the Baz Luhrman and the Franco Zefferelli Productions of Romeo and Juliet Focusing on Act 3 Scene 1 Baz Luhrman and Franco Zefferelli explore and interpret Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" and present them both in very different ways, mainly due to the fact that Shakespeare didn't write too many stage directions on his plays. Besides the language he used, there was few stage directions for them to base there work upon, allowing them free to interpret into completely separate ways. But, the one thing they kept the same was the language Shakespeare wrote in. Making it still obviously a Shakespearian film, even though it was set in different times. This essay will explain how Mercutio is portrayed in both adaptations of the film. It will also be looking at the settings, music, expressions and the actions of the other characters around and with Mercutio. Luhrman set his film in the present day (1996), which best captures the essence of Shakespeare for the present-day viewer and although the language is still in Shakespeare's style, it still seems easier to understand when put into present day context. The movie begins with the prologue but instead of it being in the usual form of a chorus talking it is set into a television broadcast, which would has been modernized into present-day environment. ...read more.

Middle

In Luhrman's film, the first time we catch a glimpse to the other side of Mercutio is when they are at the party and Mercutio goes into a kind of trance mode. Talking nonsense and shouting and screaming. This is when he offers Romeo a pill which has a heart inside it; this could make us see that Mercutio isn't all innocent as he was made out to be. We now see he likes to have a good time, but he takes risks... In the beginning of Act 3 scene 1 in Franco Zefferelli's film, Mercutio is the first character we see; he is kinsman to the Prince and best friend to Romeo; at this moment in the film he is fooling around and making a joke; which is a common trait with this character. He is with Benvolio; whose name (in Latin) means "good wisher." This could imply that Benvolio is here to help out. He starts of with warning Mercutio about the Capulet's; "The Capel's are abroad, and if we meet we shall not 'scape a brawl," which means that the Capulet's are about and if they meet them they shall end up in a fight. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, on the other hand in Luhrman's film, it is the Capulet's, which wear the plain colours, and the Montague's that wear the bright and "exciting" coloured clothing. But the Capulet's are always wearing the more serious smart look they want to show off how fierce they are. And the Montague's scruffier. In the Luhrman's version, Mercutio wears clothes that reflect his personality and nature, they are bright and outgoing, at the Ball party he dresses up as a woman in a diminutive silver costume. He could be gay but it was left for the viewers' own opinion. You can see at the dance, the way he flaunts himself around parades around, he is the centre of attention at one point. He isn't ashamed to expose himself in front of anybody. He actually enjoys the attention. This is what you would expect of him, and what the other characters expected of him. In conclusion I think that the Luhrman version and the Zefferelli version are very different. They have the same dialogue but show Mercutio, the Capulets and the Montagues in very different depths. Although Luhrmans film may be more appealing to the younger viewers, due to its modern day actors and easy plot, Zefferelli's was once popular to its own audience of it's time. They have explored different ways in which you can interpret Shakespeare's work and have both been successful in doing so. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Romeo and Juliet section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Romeo and Juliet essays

  1. The major differences between the two movies Romeo and Juliet who were made by ...

    sad he will be deeply depressed but if he is mad he will go on a rampage and regret his actions. Romeo; "Ah word ill urg'd to one that is so ill. In sadness, cousin, I do love a women."

  2. Comparing two versions of Romeo & Juliet (Zefferelli and Baz Luhram).

    The Nurse then tells Juliet the same news; we see this well by the line 'My only love sprung from my only hate!� which gives the message across clearly. Romeo and Juliet meet under different circumstances in the modern version, Romeo has just taken some kind of hallucinogen, a drug

  1. "Romeo and Juliet" essay focusing on Act 3: Scene 1

    His is also suggested by his name. In Shakespearean times the name Tybalt was common with cats. Tybalt also has a reputation for being a good swordsman and on the whole the Capulet family are shown to be easily angered, as portrayed in both Zeffirelli and Luhrman films by their choice in clothing, (red and yellow or black leather)

  2. How effectively do Baz Luhrmann and Franco Zeffirelli interpret Act I Scene VI when ...

    Tybalt goes to Lord Capulet and complains, he seems to hope that Lord Capulet will do something about the Montague's but he does nothing. The reply is: "Content thee, gentle coz, let him alone" Lord Capulet is trying to

  1. An essay to compare different productions of 'Romeo and Juliet' with reference to the ...

    In Luhrmann's version, the sun replaces the stars, and the water replaces the motif of power, for example, when Romeo and Juliet make love in the swimming pool during the balcony scene. The two versions aim at different audiences. The Zeffirelli version attracted a traditional audience who were mainly Shakespeare enthusiasts that were pleased with the realism of the play.

  2. How does Shakespeare achieve drama and tension in Act 3 scene 5 (line 65 ...

    I would the fool were married to her grave'. This is (like) rejection because she wishes Juliet was dead. Lord Caplets sentences are very short and snappy and he begins to ask a string of questions 'will she none?', ' Is she not proud?'

  1. Pre Twentieth Century Drama Coursework - Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet - What is the ...

    They dance together and fall in love - not knowing each other's identity. Tybalt detects Romeo and is very angry in seeing him in the party. He wants to kill him but Lord Capulet clarifies to him that killing him in the mansion will spoil the party.

  2. How does director Luhrman Engage the Modern Audience in his Film Version of William ...

    played in slow motion so the audience focuses on it even more. When Romeo drops the gun there is a long clear camera shot of it. There is some kind of religious symbol on the gun. Once again there are implications of God, which relates to one of the Ten Commandments, 'though shalt not kill'.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work