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Compare and contrast how the language and techniques used create characters, atmosphere and setting in The Red Room and A Vendetta

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Introduction

English Essay Compare and contrast how the language and techniques used create characters, atmosphere and setting in The Red Room and A Vendetta In this essay, I will compare and contrast two stories; The Red Room by H. G. Wells, and A Vendetta by Guy De Maupassant. Both of these authors use confusion and contrast, in both the characters, the setting and the atmosphere in their stories. These techniques help to keep the reader interested and excited, by keeping the story unpredictable. The language used to create characters in both stories causes some confusion, both over their own views, and over the views of the reader in relation to the characters. The narrator of The Red Room's opinion changes and twist sharply in the story, and in A Vendetta, the reader is manipulated into pitying different characters throughout the story. Both of these confusion techniques, although they may not have been used intentionally by the authors, serve to make the story less predictable, and therefore more interesting and entertaining. The narrator of The Red Room is a logical, matter-of-fact person, but when he enters the Red Room, all his logic is lost. The phrase "last vestiges of reason crushed" demonstrates how a sensible, rational person can completely lose control in the wrong situation. Using the term "last vestiges" in this way gives the impression that, although he hadn't shown it, the narrator had already been becoming more and more afraid and irrational as the night went on. ...read more.

Middle

In writing the story using language that contrasts against itself, and twisting the reader's loyalties, Guy De Maupassant creates a controversy over these character's situations, which would have attracted readers to the story. The title of the story 'A Vendetta', could have implied a straightforward revenge story, so many readers could have expected a simple, violent story. However, the actual plot was intended to be much more complicated. Both of these stories use confusion and unpredictability to keep readers interested. In The Red Room, the author appears to be using these techniques to impress his views on science upon the reader. When the story was written, science was becoming more popular, but most people were still firmly religious. In A Vendetta, the author seems to have less of a personal reason for causing this type of controversy. Where H. G. Wells seemed to want to convince people science was the truth for his own reasons, Guy De Maupassant appears to be using the techniques simply to create an exciting and interesting story. At the very end, when the reader is manipulated into feeling glad that the widow is finally relieved after her vengeance, the author causes a strange effect, which the reader may not even notice. At the start, the reader feels sorry for the widow Saverini because her son was murdered. ...read more.

Conclusion

Likewise, A Vendetta has a dark and gruesome ending, and any pleasant effect created by the seemingly cosy community they live in, creates a stark contrast with the treachery and brutality between the inhabitants of the small town. These two stories are very different, in plot, techniques and even length. However, both authors use similar contrast and misdirection techniques to create interest and excitement in the stories. In The Red Room, the characters are used to twist the story, and keep the reader guessing until the end as to what will happen. The atmosphere helps to foreshadow the terrifying climax, despite the setting contrasting this to give the impression of pleasant surroundings. A Vendetta uses similar methods with the characters, although instead of trying to change the reader's opinions, like the H. G. Wells, Guy De Maupassant uses them to create controversy and shock around the characters' actions and the reader's feeling towards them. In A Vendetta, contrast techniques are used to convey a strangely cosy and comfortable atmosphere, with a close community, but the setting of the story, in such a hostile and aggressive environment, hints at the horrific end to the story. This method would cause the reader to be more shocked and surprised by the ending, because the atmosphere suggested such a pleasant situation. Wells and De Maupassant used different techniques for different reasons. Both cleverly created contrast and uncertainty to keep readers interested and excited, attributes essential for successful stories. ...read more.

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