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Compare and contrast 'London' and 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge'.

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Introduction

London and Westminster Bridge After reading William Wordsworths' poem, "Composed upon Westminster Bridge" and William Blakes' "London", I tried to strip each down to its basic meanings. Each poem had similar meaning along with different characteristics. I looked at each poem in simplest text possible and got the same theme from each. From two points of view on London, it seems to be agreed, that during this time period, London was full of defeat and sorrow. In breaking down the first poem, "London, 1802", I first saw its general theme to be about England not being what it once was. Even the men of England have lost what they once were. The author writes to Milton. I do not know who this is, but can only assume that it was someone the author must have thought highly of. The reason for this is the way he tells him that England needed him. ...read more.

Middle

The second poem, "London", has the same feel to it. It is apparent that England has fallen on hard times and sorrow. It generally speaks of observations while walking by the Thames. I noticed that while describing what he sees and hears, he uses the word "cry" a lot. "In the cry of every man, In every Infant's cry of fear, and How the Chimney-sweeper's cry". Crying is usually connected with children. When the author uses it for man as well as Infant, I think that he brings the child-like quality out in man. In describing "blood down Palace walls", I think it signifies the defeat or corruption in the monarchy. I feel like this poem is straight to the point in what England has become. When the two poems are compared, obviously the first similarity is that they are about the same thing. London is in a depressing state and each poem expresses that. ...read more.

Conclusion

Blake's poem also is more about the town of London and the people in it. It definitely focuses more on the people specifically. Wordsworth's poem seems to be more about England itself. It briefly discusses the people, but in a way that deals with him personally as opposed to what he sees. Even the structure of each poem is completely different. "London" is basically every other line in each verse rhyming. "London, 1802" has a strange, unorganized rhyme pattern. Each poem has a different focus in whole. It was hard to compare and contrast two poems when I don't know as much about it as I should. At first I thought they would compare more just by reading the title and glancing at the poem itself. Instead, I got a deeper insight by breaking each one down to see what they each had to offer. I found the two perspectives to be interesting and personable. Although, in the end I think each poem could easily go hand in hand in telling the basic sorrows of London, England. ...read more.

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