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Compare and contrast of inspector Goole and Mr Birling in act one. How does J.B Priestley use dramatic devices to help shape an audiences' response to views presented in this play.

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Introduction

Compare and contrast of inspector Goole and Mr Birling in act one. How does J.B Priestley use dramatic devices to help shape an audiences' response to views presented in this play. An Inspector Calls was set in 1912 but performed in 1946. There are a range of dramatic devices used in this play. An Inspector Calls consider how J.B Priestley combines dramatic effectiveness with political comments in 'An Inspector Calls'. An inspector calls can be described as a carefully constructed play as the author, J.B Priestley combines dramatic devices with strong language. Though this essay Priestley is trying to achieve the cumulative dramatic effect by hearing the characters reactions to the consequences of both their own and other people's actions, also the structure of the play and hearing the characters tell their own stories. In this play "An Inspector Calls", J.B. Priestley creates tension throughout the play, by using historical and social issues, which give the play its context. We will be looking at this play to show how Priestly presents this to the audience. When comparing and contrasting the differences between the two characters: Mr.Birling and the inspector, in regards to attitudes, values and morals. In the play Mr.Birling is known to be a "hard-headed business man". However the inspector is not in anyway interested in Mr.Birling or what he says or does about his business, he is more interested on getting information from him. ...read more.

Middle

However Priestley also uses the inspector so that he could correct Birling and make him look like a fool with his mistakes in front of the audience. The Birlings represent the richer people in society that do not care for their fellow people; for example, Birling sacked Eva Smith for striking for a higher salary. At the end of act 1, Sheila says "why - you fool - he knows. Of course he knows. And I hate to think how much he knows that we don't yet. You'll see. You'll see". By Sheila saying this, it shapes the audiences response and leaves them feeling and thinking about what she said. Sheila appears to understand that the Inspector already knows all the facts and will force them to admit the truth sooner rather than later. In her conversation with Gerald, he claims that he will be able to keep the truth of his affair with Eva Smith a secret from the Inspector. Sheila calls Gerald "a fool" and correctly tells him that the Inspector "knows about everything." Priestly uses many techniques to build up tension at the ends of Acts 1 and 2. This includes the control of the plot and the characters relationships and development. Priestly uses Mr.Birling's very fixed personality to create some dramatic irony from the audience's perspective. "I say there isn't a chance of war... makes war impossible. The Titanic. Unsinkable, absolutely unsinkable. By 1940 you'll be living in a world that'll have forgotten all these Capital verses Labour agitations. ...read more.

Conclusion

Come, come, you can see that, can't you?" but Sheila realises that everything is not different and that they have still done terrible things, "It frightens me the way you talk. You're pretending everything's just as it was before." - This is when the Birlings receive a nasty shock. A phone call from the police saying that a girl has just died, after swallowing disinfectant and that they are sending an Inspector over to the house. The capitalists have refused to learn the lesson which the character of the Inspector has tried so hard to teach them and Because of this, they must start to learn all over again. In conclusion, the main outline or contrast of the story line is the ending of the play. Dramatic irony is used when the telephone rings and there is a moment's complete silence. This has the audiences thinking and shocked, as they had no idea. Priestly uses many different techniques to create tension throughout the whole play and also silence and pauses are very important in the creation of tension as many people are at the edge of their seats wanting to know what happens next in the play. Throughout this essay Priestley is trying to get the point across that we don't only look after ourselves, but we look after each other and help each other, whereas this is still relevant today as we have to be socially responsible. "We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other". Santana yalda ...read more.

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