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Compare and Contrast Poetry: “Dulce Et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen and “The Soldier” by Rupert Brooke Both poems, “Dulce Et Decorum Est” and “The Soldier” focus on the subject of war, although each di

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Introduction

Compare and Contrast Poetry: "Dulce Et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen and "The Soldier" by Rupert Brooke Both poems, "Dulce Et Decorum Est" and "The Soldier" focus on the subject of war, although each differ in their descriptions. "Dulce Et Decorum Est" is a realistic poem, set during the First World War. The poet himself served during that time and knew precisely the horrors of battle and conflict. In "The Soldier", Rupert Brooke had never seen what war is about, only heard of how glorious it would be to die for his country. Each poem is also written about death; Wilfred Owen seeing somebody die from a gas attack, Rupert Brooke on how Heaven would be when he died for England. The tone in which each poem is delivered differs greatly. Wilfred Owen writes in an almost angry tone, tinged with sadness at the great loss in conflict. ...read more.

Middle

He uses similes throughout the piece to put across the images he saw e.g. "...like a devil's sick of sin" and "Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud". He also uses metaphors like "Men marched asleep" but mostly similes in the poem. Rupert Brooke paints perfect, gentle images in the reader's mind. He uses personification, personifying England as a woman who gave him his life, and he wants to repay 'her' for everything that she gave him i.e. his life and happiness at home. Wilfred Owen uses graphic vocabulary in "Dulce t Decorum Est": "floundering like a man in fire or lime," "he plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning." He also incorporates militaristic vocabulary, including words such as flares, gas shells to reflect what he's portraying and to add to the depth of the poem. He includes Latin: "Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori," to possibly finish of the rhyme at the end of the poem. ...read more.

Conclusion

The poetry was quite haunting. The images were very clear in my head. I could see them fumbling with their gas masks; I could see the bulging eyes of the dying man. It sent shivers down my spine, because the descriptions are so real. "The Soldier" was also a good poem, though it was difficult to understand. I felt that the poet was ignorant. I thought that he was "silly little man" for underestimating the horrors of war. And I thought that even though he was very patriotic, he kept saying England, and this made me feel like he was looking down on anyone who didn't fight for their country (who perhaps knew what war was about). And I thought that he was also looking down on the many Welsh, Scottish and Irish that laid down their lives for the United Kingdom, not just England. But having said that, "The Soldier" was a pleasant break from all the blood and guts of war in "Dulce Et Decorum Est". ...read more.

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