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Compare and contrast Storm on the Island, by Seamus Heaney, and Patrolling Barnegat, by Walt Whitman

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Introduction

Compare and contrast Storm on the Island, by Seamus Heaney, and Patrolling Barnegat, by Walt Whitman The situations described by these two poems have much in common; both present a severe storm on the Atlantic coastline, which causes a struggle between man and nature. But the key idea, in these poems, is the different responses by the two poets to their situation. Both are in the first person, and the sensuous information and the thoughts of the poets about the situation. Storm on the Island shows the sheer terror felt by those in the storm, whilst Patrolling Barnegat is a tribute to the coastguards whom Whitman very much admires. They are similar in some features of language; they use military imagery to describe the wind's actions, and techniques such as alliteration and. They differ massively in their structure; Storm on the Island uses a distinct sentence structure, whilst Whitman writes his poem without using a single finite verb. ...read more.

Middle

Whitman would want to create this effect, as it further increases the apparent braveness of the coastguard, whom he admires. Storm on the Island also wishes to depict the danger of the storm, but for different reasons. Like Patrolling Barnegat, it also uses a metaphor compares the storm to an animal; the spray "spits like a tame cat turned savage". This is a similar idea to the "roar" in Whitman's poem, but further developed; usually, the sea is calm, and a provider of food in the form of fish, but today, the storm has turned against its master and become "savage". Heaney also, towards the end of the poem, uses military imagery; amongst many examples, he tells us that the wind "dives and strafes", like a fighter plane, and that "we are bombarded by the empty air". ...read more.

Conclusion

Despite the personas' preparations for the storm, they still end up living in fear of the fearsome tempest. In Patrolling Barnegat, the poem is made up of one very long phrase, without a single finite verb (apart from those in the brackets). This could stress how the storm is seemingly never-ending, and thus furthers the impressive nature of those confronting the night's weather. The people are not, at first, apparent in the poem; certainly in the first six lines, they are not mentioned whatsoever; their actions are described from line seven, but, in fact, they themselves are not described until the penultimate line; this lack of clarity emphasizes the lack of clarity that one experiences during a storm, due to the heaviness of the rain. It also develops a sort of suspense; the reader wonders what is "breasting" and "advancing" through this storm, before realising that this is some sort of coastguard. This is effective, and adds to the feeling of admiration that Whitman feels towards these three noble men. ...read more.

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