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Compare and contrast The Monkey's Paw, Lamb to the slaughter and Lost Hearts

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Introduction

Compare and contrast The Monkey's Paw, Lamb to the slaughter and Lost Hearts During the last three months we have been studying three short stories, The Monkey's Paw by W.W.Jacobs. Lamb to the slaughter by Rould Dohl and Lost Hearts by M.R.James. The three stories have some different themes but are similar in many ways. The themes of, The Monkey's Paw, are greediness, guilt and fate. The themes of Lamb to the slaughter are love anger and fate. The themes of Lost Hearts are murder mystery and fate. The story The Monkey's Paw. Is about a family that gains three wishes that would be granted by the monkey's paw. The monkey's paw had a spell put on it by an "old Fakir." The family becomes too greedy, even though the Sergeant major warned them to "wish for something sensible." The family ignores the Sergeant and wishes for money but the wish has a huge consequence, the consequence was the loss of their own son. Lamb to the slaughter, is about a very dominating husband and a 1930's stereotypical wife. One day after she had been waiting for him to return home from work, like she always did, he was acted really strange, and "he did an unusual thing." ...read more.

Middle

Her life revolves around him. Patrick Malony is dominant and depends on his wife for most things. "Sit down just for a minute sit down. It wasn't till then that she began to get frightened. Go on he said sit down." Patrick Malony is very secretive. The police officers are first suspicious but then after time at the house they become comfortable in Mary Malony's presents. Sam is the shopkeeper in the story he doesn't notice any thing wrong with Mary but when he asks the question, "how're you." Mary just answers, "I want some potatoes please." She avoids the question implying maybe things aren't okay. The characters in, Lost hearts, are Mr Abney, Stephen, Mrs Bunch and Mr Parkes. Mr Abney is a strange direct person and keeps him self to himself. "The offer was unexpected because all who knew any thing of Mr Abney looked upon him as a some what austere recluse." "very little was known of Mr Abney's pursuits or temper." Stephen the, "small boy," is vulnerable, young, has no direct family. He asks questions about every thing. "Is Mr Abney a good man, and will he go to heaven?" ...read more.

Conclusion

The culture in The Monkey's Paw, shows us that the story is English but isn't modern by the selection of vocabulary. Lamb to the slaughter, culture is English but there are some words that could be said to relate to an American vocabulary like, "grocery." The word grocery has a strong American culture. The culture in Lost hearts, is also English but is written in a very old English. This is the oldest of all the stories and can be seen by the way sentences are written, "the offer was unexpected because all who knew any thing of Mr Abney," The most popular image in all the stories is the image of fire it is mentioned in all the stories. Fire is the image if warmth and comfort but is it also a warning and can be dangerous. There are also images of drink, and doors opening. The image of opening doors could have something to do the deaths of the family members and could symbolise a new beginning with out someone you love. The stories have very different content but are similar in many ways; themes can be the same and so can the characters if you look deep enough at the background and what the have done there are similarities. ...read more.

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