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Compare and Contrast the Opening chapters of Lord of the Flies by William Golding and Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.

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Introduction

Compare and Contrast the Opening chapters of Lord of the Flies by William Golding and Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. Lord of the Flies written by William Golding and published in 1954 is written in modern society, during the time of the cold war conflict, whereas Great Expectations was written in 1861, during the Victorian era. The differences in style in which the books are written are immediately obvious to the reader. This essay discusses the similarities and differences of all aspects of both opening chapters. The opening chapter of Great Expectations, which is written in the first person, concerns a young boy called Pip. The reader immediately gets the impression that he is very young by the way in which he portrays himself. Pip describes himself as 'undersized for my years, and not strong.' He would obviously not be able to fend for himself in a bad situation as we see when he meets Magwitch and also he is not mature enough to make conscious adult decisions. ...read more.

Middle

In Great Expectations we see that Pip also abides by what adults say no matter who they are or what they look like. As soon as Magwitch threatens Pip we see the 'small bundle of shivers' that he is described as. Magwitch although he is a convict he still has control over Pip because he is an adult and Pip is too scared to disobey him. Here the convict Magwitch manages to get Pip to do what he wants him to do. The importance of adults is very significant in both books because they effect the actions of all of the boys directly. In Lord of the Flies although the adults aren't actually on the island with the boys they influence them greatly. Every decision that they are making adds another question of what would the adults do? These sub conscious decisions of what would the adults do slowly drift away and the children think about what they want to do. ...read more.

Conclusion

As soon as it is mentioned there are murmurs but the heat is turned straight onto who they wish to chose as a leader. This shows that their fear of not being rescued is very strong as they feel that they can't talk about it. This also shows a fear of not wanting to face reality. Although, at the moment they are enjoying the fact that there aren't any adults around they are reluctant to come to the conclusion that they may never be rescued. The places where the two different novels take place are in two completely different places but there are small connections between the two. Both places are near to water . The sea in Lord of the Flies is all around but is a beautiful blue and seems welcoming. The river in Great Expectations is very much the opposite. It is described as 'not yet so broad, nor so black'. The water here draws up am image of a slowly flowing river, murky and un-welcoming. The sea in Lord of the Flies is clear sparkling and gives the image that the whole islandis like that. ...read more.

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