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Compare and contrast the presentation of London in Composed upon London Bridge and London

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Compare and contrast the presentation of London in "Composed upon London Bridge" and "London" London is the capital city ok the England and it symbolises all of the different cultures there are in this country. London is a poem about life in London around the time of 1792 it is a poem with the theme of revolution and by chance the French revolution. The poem is written by William Blake. Where as Composed upon London Bridge this poem is a celebration written in sonnet form. Both poems are talking about how London is changing. London written by William Blake is written in the first person view "I wander", so you get personal thoughts and opinions, he writes about how London is a controlled area and a feeling of regulation. The first verse of London makes you feel like you are under control because with "charted" implies that every thing has been mapped out which over all causes you to feel trapped and without freedom he also uses repetition and already there is a negative theme. Whereas in the poem written by William Wordsworth the first three lines describe London as "a sight so touching in its majesty", so clearly his view of London is one of wonder as is shown in his first line "EARTH has not anything to show more fair" here you can see that he really does see his capital city as something beautiful. ...read more.


There is a different tone being used by these two poets Blake is using rather violent language "Runs in blood.." this is used to grate affect as it dose paint London in a bad way, of being this dirty place where there is not much happiness. On the other hand Wordsworth, throughout, his poem has been using attractive language "never did the sun mare beautifully steep" this gives us the image of the sun rising up over London on what is described as a gorgeous morning. At the end of William Blake's poem he describes the inhabitants of London and the noises he hears about the city "how the youthful harlot's curse" this implies that young people are forced in to prostitution, Blake also depicts them in a vulgar image about them he shows his distaste and dislike for them, his depiction of the people of London is that they are rough, noisy and unclean. William Wordsworth's portrayal of his London is a lot nicer "Ne'er saw I, felt, a calm so deep!" and "sear God! The very houses seem asleep" this could be due to the fact that Wordswoth's poem was written ten years after William Blake wrote his, a lot could have changed in ten years for there to be such different attitudes towards London. ...read more.


Wordsworth's poem seems to have more aspects of freedom in "Open unto the fields, and to the sky;" here he seems to be unrestricted by walls of the city whereas in William Blake's poem you feel trapped. His poem is only split into two sentences which causes you to become breathless, this makes the sound of the poem seem like you are helplessly in love. These two poets have London as their subject in their poems but they describe London with completely different attitudes, William Blake having a rather depressed view of London, which comes across strongly with the language that he uses. The poem I that I prefer is William Wordsworth's "composed upon Westminster bridge" because the language he uses has a sense of sincerity about it this makes me fell as though he really does have these deep feelings about London, which William Blake dose the opposite by extravagating what he sees. I learnt that there are two totally different views of London and that at different times of the day you will see those two sides of London. While in the morning you get the tranquil peace you would love, in the evening you get an insight to the ugly side to what is going on with all of the cries and corruption happening. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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