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Compare and Contrast the proposals of Mr. Collins and Mr. Darcy

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Introduction

Compare and Contrast the proposals of Mr. Collins and Mr. Darcy In the novel 'Pride and Prejudice' quite a few marriages and proposals occur. Two proposals that we learn about are from Mr. Collins and Mr. Darcy - these are two very interesting proposals, as you will see. Mr. Collins and Mr. Darcy both choose to propose to Elizabeth and we find out that they both get rejected by her. When both men propose to Elizabeth, she turns them down for an obvious reason - 'love'. Elizabeth did not feel that she was in love with either of them in fact the thought of marrying Mr. Collins, just made Elizabeth laugh. 'The idea of Mr. Collins, with all his solemn composure, being run away with by his feelings, made Elizabeth so near laughing....' Elizabeth was extremely shocked when Darcy proposed to her, as she had no idea that an event like this would occur as she hated Mr. ...read more.

Middle

Darcy must have thought that Elizabeth had the same feelings towards him but obviously she didn't, but at least he wasn't selfish like Mr. Collins who thought that it was a necessity to marry. Both men manage to offend Elizabeth in some way; Mr. Collins offends her by not letting her have her say in whether she wants to marry him or not and he talks of her as- 'Modesty and economy' Mr. Darcy offends her by telling her that- 'His sense of her inferiority - of its being a degradation - of the family obstacles which judgement had always opposed to inclination...' When you finish chapter 19 you don't really feel sorry for the rejected Mr. Collins, as Jane Austen did not want you to sympathise with him. Mr. Collins comes across as a very pompous, selfish, and uncaring man throughout the whole book, I do not think Austen wanted us to like him. ...read more.

Conclusion

At the end of Mr. Darcy's proposal, Darcy left in a gentleman like way- 'You have said quite enough, madam. I perfectly comprehend your feelings, and have now only to be ashamed of what my own have been. Forgive me for having taken up so much of your time, and accept my best wishes for your health and happiness'. 'And with these words he hastily left the room, and Elizabeth heard him the next moment open the front door and quit the house'. This chapter shows a real gentleman, the other chapter with Mr. Collins shows quite the opposite. Commentary. I think that I have shown some of the contrasts that there are in these chapters of the two proposals. It can be seen that at this stage of the book that neither Darcy or Collins were suitable for Elizabeth to marry. Elizabeth wanted to marry for love not just for money. Although Darcy was offering love for Elizabeth she could not love him back as she thought that he was something that he wasn't. ...read more.

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