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Compare and contrast the two poems, 'The Lamb' and 'The Tyger' by William Blake

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Introduction

English Coursework Compare and contrast the two poems, 'The Lamb' and 'The Tyger' by William Blake This essay will focus on the enchanting poem, 'The Lamb' which is taken from the 'Songs of Innocence' which will be compared and contrasted with the mysterious poem, 'The Tyger', which is taken from the 'Songs of Experience'. The poem of 'The Lamb' represents the child's early years whereas 'The Tyger' portrays an adult (the dominator). Blake has constructed these two poems from natural views and by comparing and contrasting them I may end up with an answer on what Blake is trying to explain in these poems. The settings of each poem are set distinctively as each poem is set to suit their title. The place at which 'The Lamb' is set, 'By the stream and o'er the mead', immediately gives us the image of a meadow, and as if a child is playing in the meadow. This contrasts to 'The Tyger' as Blake has set this poem, 'in the forests of the night', which conveys a view of darkness; something that only an adult would understand. This gives a sign of apprehension. The word 'night' could be symbolic of the cave or layer of which 'The Tyger' survives which would be murky and humid. The repetition of the word 'Tyger' builds atmosphere as if Blake is eager to get its attention or maybe it has something important to tell him and he wants to ensure the tiger is listening. ...read more.

Middle

However, both poems use questions and are both used in the same manner. "Little Lamb, who made thee?" in 'The Lamb' and "What immortal...Thy fearful symmetry?" shows this. The questions are answered in 'The Lamb but not 'The Tyger' because in a way the poem of 'The Tyger' resembles an adult, as an adult loses its faith in God and doesn't see reason to answer. Where as the lamb is like a child and the child has answered us in our quest of who made thee. The child answers because it is learning to know God and become one with God. God, the lamb and the child all equal a whole. In 'The Tyger' I think the voice is an adult male as these types of people are extremely dominating like the poem is. 'The Tyger' begins with "Could frame..." because the poet is questioning what 'could' have made such a powerful yet beautiful creature. What had the power to do so? The poet questions whilst the adult is not sure what is going on. It ends with "Dare frame..." because the adult has assumed the tiger is a creature that has been made on purpose and his having doubts about God's goodness, so it assumes that whoever created this creature is daring in doing so. In both poems, creation is described as deliberate in a way because in 'The Tyger' the point is made that it couldn't be by accident that this creature was made. ...read more.

Conclusion

The child can understand a nursery rhyme. This is contrasted with the rhyming sentence from 'The Tyger' "What the anvil? What dead grasp... terrors clasp?" which is rhymed like a type of chant. Chants that are meant be heard, a chant of an adult. The surroundings of the lamb are shown in the sentence, "gave thee life and bid thee feed... oe'r the mead" which indicates that this creature lives in a beautiful habitat. This contrasts with the lines from 'The Tyger' "Tyger, Tyger burning ... forests of the night" which in other words is suggesting that the tiger lives in a dark forest, which normally associates a daring and drastic habitat. All these are used as it gives the reader more to think about whilst reading the poem. It helps the readers think for themselves of why the tiger is known for being vicious and the lamb being the complete opposite. These two poems have had many conclusions from many different people. It all depends on how you read the poems. My belief is that Blake has so much fascination with this tiger that he doesn't really want an answer from where the tiger has come but likes to think of all the possibilities that it could have come from. 'The Lamb' on the other hand answers the question and I believe that Blake's message in this poem is that God is innocent and that the lamb is a symbol of the goodness of God. Alex Nash 10E English ...read more.

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