• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare and contrast the view that 'An Arrest' is a tale of nature rejecting a human villain with the view that it is concerned only with a vengeful superego

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Raheel Idrees 11da Compare and contrast the view that 'An Arrest' is a tale of nature rejecting a human villain with the view that it is concerned only with a vengeful superego 'An Arrest' is an ambiguous story. You can look at it in different ways. One way to see it is as a tale of nature rejecting a human villain. This view is put forward right from the beginning. When the narrator uses words such as "confined" and "fugitive" to describe the state of Orrin Brower, he creates the image of an animal isolated from human society. This is because 'confined' is usually a word to do with animals or mad people who are not allowed to be in contact with humans Further evidence to support the argument of Orrin Brower being portrayed as a savage beast comes when the author writes that he had, "recovered liberty," which is like an animal being released into the wild. Orrin Brower does not feel guilty for beating Burton Duff or think of the consequences of his actions, as a human would; he only feels and acknowledges his freedom which is an animal-like thing to do. ...read more.

Middle

Nevertheless, when Bierce writes "his head and back ached with a prophecy of buckshot," it tells us that even though he is going back to human society and admitting he is a human, he still feels he is to be treated like an animal. Again nature seems to have power over Brower and the figure as we read 'only once did Brower venture a turn of the head: just once, when he was in deep shadow and the other was in moonlight' which indicates that nature spotlights what it wants Brower to see- the thing that will keep him going forward. The final sentence of the penultimate paragraph states 'then he turned. Nobody else entered' which shows that nature sent the figure as it stops outside the human /forest boundaries. Nature has done its part and driven the criminal back to justice- Brower must face it alone. The other way to look at this tale is to view it as a tale concerned only with a vengeful superego. The man who has escaped from prison, Orrin Brower, has done some very bad things but does not show any signs of a guilty conscience. ...read more.

Conclusion

The repetition of 'straight' in the final paragraph shows that Brower is going to stability and justice- it also suggests that Brower has a desire to go back to human society- a desire driven by his conscience. As Brower enters the prison he sees, "the dead body of Burton Duff," so you can conclude that the figure following him to the prison was not human at all. As I mentioned earlier Brower has committed some serious crimes which are the result of the id part of his brain taking over. The id is the part of our brain which wants all our basic needs- our Inner Desires- such as sleep, food and sex. However our superego stops us from becoming lazy, greedy or rapists. What happened to Brower is that his id took over and his superego was shunned so he committed these crimes without any guilt. At the clearing in the forest, Brower's superego suddenly starts operating again and conjures up the image to make the guilty conscience, which comes with it, disappear by sending him back to justice. Bierce seems to have dropped many hints to leave both views arguably correct. Personally, I think Bierce has done this deliberately to leave the story as ambiguous as the title. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Animal Farm section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work