• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare and contrast the way in which the Directors of 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstein' (1994) and 'Frankenstein' (1931) use diff

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare and contrast the way in which the Directors of 'Mary Shelley's Frankenstein' (1994) and 'Frankenstein' (1931) use different film techniques to build up atmosphere in their opening sequences. Mary Shelley wrote her novel 'Frankenstein' when she was just a young girl of nineteen. She wrote it in 1816, when she went on holiday with her friend, Byron. Byron was already a famous poet, and it was him who suggested that whilst they were away, they should both write a ghost story. At the time it was just a way of passing time and having fun for Mary Shelley, but little did she know that her story would become famous worldwide. Many adaptations of 'Frankenstein' have been made for cinema in the 20th century. Two of the most significant being those studied in this assignment. A man named James Whale directed the film 'Frankenstein' which was released in 1931. He was a British born director with a history of working in theatre, and this is probably the reason as to why his film imitates the stage in places. It was filmed at Universal Pictures, which was a very powerful Hollywood studio. The film opened on 4 November 1931 at the Mayfair Theatre in New York's Times Square and it caused an immediate sensation. It was voted one of the films of the year by the New York Times and earned Universal Pictures $12 million. ...read more.

Middle

Branagh still uses the diegetic sound effectively, which helps bring realism to the setting, like in Whale's version. He uses the sounds of wind howling which is very atmospheric. Branagh has chosen to use non-diegetic sound in his film because he can accentuate the tension wherever he wants. For example, when the captain and the sailor are talking, it is obvious that Branagh wanted to accentuate the word 'mutiny', because the use of the word is accompanied by orchestral music using very strong chords to reflect the drama. I think that although the tones of the actors voices can be used to build up tension, it can be done far more effectively with non-diegetic music. That is one of the reasons why I think the drama is built up far more in Branagh's version than in Whale's version. The monster's howl in Branagh's version builds up a sense of mystery, because the howl can be heard and yet nothing can be seen. There is a constant threat that you can't see what is there. The monster's howl is isolated. There is no other sound over it. It would not be possible to isolate the sound of the howl without the effect of stopping the non-diegetic music. It is the non-diegetic sounds in Branagh's film which makes the opening scene so tense and dramatic. The Mise en Scene used in James Whale's 'Frankenstein' suggests to the audience a very strong atmosphere of death and evil. ...read more.

Conclusion

However in Branagh's opening sequence there are over 57 edits in just 2 minutes. Branagh also uses the style of the edit effectively to add movement to the sequence. An example of when he uses the style of the edit very effectively is when the dogs are being murdered. He uses a series of jump cuts at a very quick speed to add dramatic movement. I think that both Directors are trying to create a strong atmosphere and tension. They both want their audience to be full of suspense after the opening sequences. In doing so they set the mood for the rest of the film. Both Whale and Branagh use the same techniques but in very different ways. Branagh uses non-diegetic sound very effectively to create a tense atmosphere. However Whale uses silence to the same effect but in a very different way. Both Directors use the theme of death in their opening sequences. Whale uses the theme of death, setting his opening sequence in a grave yard and by using props which all symbolize death and Branagh represents the theme of death by using very pale make up and by setting it in a deathly cold place. They also use isolation to create tension. They use their different styles and techniques very effectively, by engaging their audiences to create the same emotion. However, I do think that Branagh uses his techniques, the sound and the mise en scene more effectively to create a brilliant film and a very powerful, emotionally charged atmosphere. ?? ?? ?? ?? Emma Harvey - 1 - ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Mary Shelley section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Mary Shelley essays

  1. Examine the complex story of Mary Shelleys novel Frankenstein.

    so, on his wedding night he sends Elizabeth away to a hideaway to await his return. Victor hears a scream, and rushes to the hideaway, Elizabeth is dead. Victor goes searching for the monster but he falls ill and eventually dies, and the Captain of the ship finds the monster sobbing over Victor.

  2. Compare and Contrast "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley and "Flowers For Algernon" by Daniel Keyes, ...

    created the "wretch" and no sooner had he completed his ambition he realised the consequences of his actions and abandoned his responsibility and left his creation to suffer. One of the most controversial aspects of Shelley's work is the idea that Frankenstein's monster is comprised of body parts, that were

  1. 'The novel is a powerful examination of, challenge to, what is good and evil ...

    is offering to mankind a warning of the bubbling discontent felt by many of the social prejudices which exist within this era. The gothic era generally and the novel Frankenstein was born at a time of great social unrest in England and at a time of great changes in British society during the late 18th Century and early 19th Centuries.

  2. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    For instance the screams at the start, from the ice-lands where the film begins, is very uneasy for the people upon the boat. Although Frankenstein knows what it is he does not explain quickly he uses the entire length of the film to truly explain what is out there.

  1. Compare three stories of suspense in three different styles of writing

    This poem truly illustrates the stress in the author's life. The mood of the poem is poignant, mysterious and also there is suspense within the poem. The poet used a dark, dreary night to make the mood appear sadder and suspense filled.

  2. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.

    The monster was excited at his first sight of fire. Frankenstein used transplants to create the monster, which are commonly used to save people's lives today. 'Frankenstein' is written as a Chinese-box-narrative. Three narrators are used, these are, Walton, Frankenstein and the creature, which creates more effect, as we know

  1. "Compare the way in which the directors of 'Mary Shelly's Frankenstein' (1994) and 'Frankenstein' ...

    to show the power of the actions being shown on screen, contrasting directly with a slower more classical piece to reflect the eeriness of the empty ice. Sometimes, Branagh used a musical caesura to show a high point of intense conversation or action, such as when two characters were talking about mutiny.

  2. Is Mary Shelley's Frankenstein typicalof the horror genre?

    This also makes the monster sound very frightening and this adds to the horror atmosphere in the novel. As Victor Frankenstein keeps referring to him as a "d�mon" he also seems to be evil, this is very typical of the horror genre, as there is normally an evil being that tries to destroy the rest of the characters.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work