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Compare and contrast the ways in which faulks in the 'birdsong' and Owen in 'anthem for doomed youth' have attempted to convey the 'unsurpassable' in the depiction of the Somme. How far have they succeeded?

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Introduction

Compare and contrast the ways in which faulks in the 'birdsong' and Owen in 'anthem for doomed youth' have attempted to convey the 'unsurpassable' in the depiction of the Somme. How far have they succeeded? Birdsong attempted to convey the unsurpassable in the depiction for the Somme in a very impactful way. Faulks presents this part of the novel in 1916, which was during the battle of the Somme. 'Anthem for doomed youth', a poem written by Wilfred Owen either in 1916 or after 1916 was seen as a poem who also attempted to convey the unsurpassable in the depiction for the Somme but it did succeeded in its point as far as birdsong did because it captures the readers thoughts all in one, as the poem is more neatly knitted together, clearly stating imagery, mood and tone. Faulks presents from page 224 to the end of part two of the novel in a very dramaticful way. Faulks has clearly described how each character feels, from their quotation to the way faulks has described them in a certain situation. ...read more.

Middle

Tension is clearly stated at the start of the Somme scene in the birdsong novel 'no one spoke. There was for once no sound of birds', we can see tension is slowly increasing among themselves as everything is quite and the phrase' no sound of birds' presents nature and how the image of death will destroy nature among everyone. However, the poem does talk does talk bout nature but is a more animalistic imagery, 'what passing-bells for these who die at cattle?', the description is more barbaric and harsh, but then again it does not fit well because the starting stanza talks about what the soldiers did 'only the monstrous anger of guns', they killed people which may and can be seen as a animalistic thing. Even though the first stanza starts with a negative sharp question it does make the reader get straight involved into the poem and gets them thinking. Then again this is pretty similar to birdsong as it also has animalistic imagery and gets the readers attention with full impact. The second stanza of the poem anthem for doomed youth is more to do with imagery's of religion. ...read more.

Conclusion

This could be related to how birdsong has used many short sentences 'the whistle in his mouth. His foot on the ladder. He swelled hard and blew', every sentences brings out maximum impact to the readers. It helps the reader picture slow motions of what the character is doing, and we can say that it's true that faulks and Owen do succeeded in getting the maxim response from the readers, whether it's emotional or to get them thinking. Looking back on birdsong and anthem for doomed its certain that faulks and Owen has succeeded to convey the unsurpassable depiction of the Somme, but differently that fits well with poetry depiction and novel depiction. On first reading of anthem for doomed youth, it seemed as if the poem only said the basic about the war and thought birdsong had more clearly attempted to convey the depiction of the Somme. However on second reading, I noticed that if the poem was written in 1916 or after the poem may have been more surpassable because of the torture. Nowadays we only take a humanitarian tone and we just see it as slaughter. ...read more.

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