Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  • Level: GCSE
  • Subject: English
  • Document length: 2143 words

'Compare and contrast the ways in which writers represent the supernatural in The Red Room by H.G Wells and The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy'.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Martin Hogan 5E2 GCSE ENGLISH COURSEWORK Short Stories coursework ' Compare and contrast the ways in which writers represent the supernatural in The Red Room by H.G Wells and The Withered Arm by Thomas Hardy' The Withered Arm is a supernatural story, which is set in a west Sussex town in the 1800's. It is narrated in the third person. The narrator is Hardy. The Red Room is also a supernatural story. It is set in a mysterious, old castle in England again in the 1800's. It is narrated in the first person, the narrator happens to be a scientist, determined to prove that the paranormal does not exist. Both Hardy and Wells use a variety of techniques to explore the supernatural, including examination of character, the context of the period and changing notions of the supernatural. The title The Red Room immediately imbues the story with a sense of danger and the thought of the supernatural, because we associate red with warning and danger. This quickly creates a feeling that the room is potentially dangerous. A reader's attention is immediately grabbed, because readers become curious about the room and what events have led to the mystery surrounding it. ...read more.

Middle

The rushed climax to the story is in stark contrast to the slow build and maintenance of suspense and satisfies reader expectations. The setting of The Red Room is also important, it plays a large part in creating suspense in the story .It is set in a castle and we often associate castles with history and sometimes terrible deaths. The duke of the castle obviously had a horrible death, though the circumstances surrounding this are never actually revealed to the reader, and the old people think that he is the cause of the haunting. Also castles are very large with many corridors and rooms, this adds to the feeling of uneasiness and lack of knowledge of the castle. As the narrator makes his way to the red room he becomes less and less rational as the feeling of insecurity sets in. 'I stood rigid for half a minute perhaps'. Although the man knows there is nothing there he still becomes taken in by the blackness of the whole castle. 'The darkness was there' Still we have not actually seen or heard that anything is there. As the man continues down the corridor he becomes more and more aware of the shadows around him. ...read more.

Conclusion

Gertrude can also be seen as evil as she was the one who appeared in the dream in the first place. She could be involved with witchcraft because it's She is the person who actually got hit down. Also the fact that she mixes with hangmen and Trendle show the fact she is going to the evil side of society. The reader does not know which one is the real source of evil even though Rhoda is the only one to exist this is left in suspense, which creates tension. As well as the consideration of the paranormal, how could this nice young house wife turn into an obsessive mean character. In The Red Room the language describing the journey to the red room is effective as it shows the sinister and cold feeling of the house "The echoes rang up and down the spiral staircase". Darkness is a vital part of the red room; "subterranean passage" suggests darkness and an enclosed room that I think is compared to a tomb. The descriptions "deep-toned", "chilly" and "echoing" are effective words, which sets the atmosphere and mood for what is about to occur in the red room. This leaves the reader guessing what is about to happen in the ghost-haunted room and in response the reader is on the edge of their seat. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE H.G. Wells section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE H.G. Wells essays

  1. Compare and contrast the techniques used by the writers to create a sense of ...

    a while to realise that it is the narrator who is actually feeling trapped by her husband. This contributes to the tension because you don't know who or what is trapped until the very end of the story. In 'The Red Room' the language influences how scary the story is

  2. The Red Room and The Monkey's Paw(Compare and Contrast)

    have no contact to other people and have to travel quite far to go get help. "The Red Room" however is set in a castle and as far as the reader can imagine away from people. The name of the castle is called Lorraine Castle and this is a typical

  1. How does H.G Wells use language and other devices to create suspense?

    alcove suddenly went out, and the black shadow sprang back in its place there` This quote shows that the shadows are personified by the word `sprang` The verb `sprang` means an action that is done suddenly and swiftly for example a leaping movement.

  2. "In 'The Red Room', how does H.G Wells explore the nature of fear?'

    the person who attempted the same thing before him. It states that the last person fell 'head long' down the stairs that the narrator is currently standing on. He seemed to be on the same 'mission'. This makes us and could make him think that he may be going the same way.

  1. How do the authors make these experiences seem strange and frightening to the reader? ...

    Betty Pivet in story three was staying up late ironing, because she was doing the washing for mr and Mrs Hardcome. Her husband had finished his supper and gone to bed as usual some hour or two before. Whilst doing the ironing, she heard her husband come downstairs put his boots on, walk past her and go out the door.

  2. Compare and Contrast The Story Of An Hour by K. Chopin and the Red ...

    know what she is feeling, as the narrator explains things that other characters don't know. The setting changes again towards the end given that Mrs Mallard descended the stairs and stands in what I consider to be the entryway to the house.

  1. How does H.G Wells create and sustain suspense throughout "The Red Room"?

    Firstly, we have the young against the old. Writers to build tension also use repetition. One example is on the first page: "It's your own choosing." The old man is trying to warn the young man but at the same time he is leaving the decision to him.

  2. "How do the writers of 'The Red Room' and 'Harry' create suspense and tension ...

    The man who is staying in the house has confidence and he is not afraid because he says "I can assure you". The man with the withered arm describes to the reader that he is weak and he has an injured arm.

  • Over 180,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work

Marked by a teacher

This essay has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the essay.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the essay page.

Peer reviewed

This essay has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review under the essay preview on this page.