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Compare and contrast Wordsworth’s “The Lucy Poems” with Keats’ “To Autumn”. In what ways are these typical of Romantic poetry?

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Introduction

Compare and contrast Wordsworth's "The Lucy Poems" with Keats' "To Autumn". In what ways are these typical of Romantic poetry? There are many points of both poems that are typical of Romantic poetry. "The Lucy Poems" and "To Autumn" are both individual and are concerning different subjects yet they both contain features very important to Romantic poetry. The main feature in Romantic poetry is love and human emotions, which is reflected in their poetry. In "To Autumn," Keats' love of the countryside and emotions caused by the season are shown. "Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness! Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun; Conspiring with him how to load and bless with fruit the vines that round the thatch-eaves run." His poem reflects the countryside and true pictures that he can see. The poem paints a picture of his view of life in autumn, personifying autumn as a friend of the sun. ...read more.

Middle

In "To Autumn," Keats uses his admiration of the views around him and makes detailed references to the parts he likes the most; "While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day, And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue." Wordsworth tells a story of Lucy, while describing her life using emotions he has had to experience; "I travelled among unknown men, in lands beyond the seal Nor, England! Did I know till then What love I bore to thee." A lot of romantic poetry was based on thoughts and feelings from the poet's subconscious mind. Both Wordsworth and Keats use this idea in their poetry. Keats describes the granary; "Thee sitting careless on a granary floor, Thy hair soft-lifted by the winnowing wind, Or on a half reaped furrow sound asleep, Drowsed with the fume off poppies, while thy hook." Wordsworth used the subconscious mind as well; "Thy mornings showed, thy nights concealed, The bowers where Lucy played; And thine too is the last green field That Lucy's eyes surveyed." ...read more.

Conclusion

This is typical in the Keats and Wordsworth poems. The Wordsworth poem is written in the style of a ballad, which is an earlier style of poetry. "I travelled among unknown men, In lands beyond the sea; Nor England! Did I know till then What love I bore to thee." It also has rhyming at the end of the line, typical of ballads. The Keats poem is written with every other line rhyming, though the lines are often much longer, and often not in the same beat. The poems also contain romantic language to emote the reader; "fair as a star, when only one Is shining in the sky," and "then in a wailful choir the small gnats mourn Among the river sallows, bone aloft Or sinking as the light wind lives or dies." The last point of romantic poetry is the aspect of ideas from childhood returning into the poetry. ...read more.

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