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Compare and contrast wordsworth's 'composed upon westministerbridge' and blake's 'london' - You should refer to content and use of language.

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Introduction

COMPARE AND CONTRAST WORDSWORTH'S 'COMPOSED UPON WESTMINISTER BRIDGE' AND BLAKE'S 'LONDON'. YOU SHOULD REFER TO CONTENT AND USE OF LANGUAGE. In the poems of William Wordsworth's 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' and William Blake's 'London' the comparisons and contrasts are very important. Very often in these types of poems closer inspection and greater study often help in understanding these comparisons and contrasts to a greater extent. Looking at the imagery is often the key to this. It is important to consider issue's comparisons and contrasts together so it is easier to follow. The subject matter is the most obvious and clear of the comparisons. The basis of 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' and 'London' is the fact that they are both about London. From the outset the clarity of the poems' subject matter is evident from the mentioning of London's landmarks in 'Westminster Bridge', 'Westminster Bridge', 'The river glideth'. The latter of these two comments is referring to the River Thames. 'London' mentions 'London' in the title, 'The Thames' and 'each chartered street' which shows evidence of royalty which is normally found in London as it is given the royal charter which indicates it is in the capital. The titles are also a major area of contrast. William Wordsworth uses the phrase 'Composed Upon' in his poem which is quite popular and recognisable. ...read more.

Middle

I find this amazing as the poems were written around the same era, the beginning of the 19th Century. Another thing that influences the poets' verdicts is their perspective. William Wordsworth is writing his poem on Westminster Bridge, as the title suggests, which means he can only see the tops of things from his high vantage point. 'Ships, domes, theatres and temples lie'. William Blake however, is down at street level and can see characters and the grubbiness of the streets. This was something he would see often as he lived in London. He notices that the church is becoming corrupt and evil and doesn't care about the children, 'the chimney sweepers cry', as it is not helping them. 'Every black'ning church appals'. This metaphor reflects another which shows Blake's distaste for London. 'And the hapless soldiers cry/ Runs in blood down palace walls'. This is implying that the King does not care for the soldiers just as the church does not care for the children. This later of the two metaphors shows how the King can replace his soldiers with ease so doesn't care about them even though they fight and die for him. This metaphor could also suggest the evil of war. The 'Youthful harlot' plays a very large parting the final stanza of the poem. ...read more.

Conclusion

In his octave he is describing the beauty of London; in the sestet he is reflective. William Wordsworth's magnificent sonnet shows him praising London and identifies his characteristic solitude. 'Never did the sun more beautifully steep'. This shows the sun steeping it in its light, giving a bright and refreshing view of London. William Blake's poem shows him depicting it as an awful place. But most thro' midnight streets I hear/ How the youthful harlot's curse'. The 'Youthful Harlot' is a major figure in the poem destroying the lives of many people. The midnight streets represent evil, so these two things are a very important part of William Blake's poem. They support his hatred for London. Neither poet could have written his poem in the others style. It is astounding that two popular, well-known poets could have such different views about the same place, London. Each poet may have set out originally to write the poem in their own certain way, and so for this reason chosen the time, the perspective and whether they were moving or stationary to suit their original decision. The decision they have previously chosen may have been due to their own political reasons. There are many more contrasts than comparisons in the two poems and this is obvious as they have different views of London. I find this amazing as the poems were written around the same era, the beginning of the 19th Century. David Crossan English GCSE Coursework 5E1 ...read more.

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