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Compare Carol Ann Duffy's 'Valentine' to Andrew Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress'.

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Introduction

Compare Carol Ann Duffy's 'Valentine' to Andrew Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress' In this assignment I will be comparing two love poems Carol Ann Duffy's 'Valentine' to Andrew Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress'. The poem 'Valentine' was written is the twentieth century and in it the speaker uses onion as a metaphor to show her love. The poem 'To His Coy Mistress' was written in the seventeenth century and is about the poet trying to persuade his Mistress to sleep with him. 'Valentine' by Carol Ann Duffy is very different to any other love poem as you would expect to read something romantic, instead she writes about an onion. The poem is divided into four main stanzas and each stanza tells us something new about the relationship and in between there is one or two words in sentence which helps you think about want she is trying to say. The poem starts off with a positive statement 'Not a red rose, or a satin heart'. She states that she will not give her lover a normal valentine present. The poet has chosen to give her lover an onion. She uses the onion as a metaphor for her love. ...read more.

Middle

This poem is divided into three main parts 'if', 'but' and 'so'. The first part of the poem is 'if', the speaker talks about if only he had all the time in the world, 'Had we but world enough, and time'. He refers to many religious points like the Indian Ganges and the conversion of Jews 'Till the conversion of the Jews' the reason for him to do this is because he is trying to persuade her to do something she does not want and the only way to make her believe its right is to talk about religion. The point the speaker is trying to get across to the mistress is if he had all the time in the world he would love her forever. The second part of the poem is about 'but', the speaker talks about the reasons he wants to sleep with her. He talks about how time is running out, because soon they will get old and die 'Times winged chariot hurrying near'. The speaker also uses metaphors like 'deserts of vast eternity' as he tries to make her believe that they are running out of time. ...read more.

Conclusion

So overall the two love poems Carol Ann Duffy's 'Valentine' and Andrew Marvell's 'To His Coy Mistress' are written about same topics but for different reasons. 'Valentine is written to express the true feelings of the poet. There are many points we can see this from, but the main one is what the poem does not rhyme which means that it was not thought about when being written, 'To His Coy Mistress' is written to persuade so it is only about one topic 'sex' and there are many religious comparisons to make this look right. This is also done by the poem being divided into three main parts 'if', 'but' and 'so'. The first part of the poem is 'if', the speaker talks about if only he had all the time in the world. This helps him to define his reason to why he is trying to sleep with her quickly as possible. The second part of the poem is about 'but', the speaker talks about the reasons he wants to sleep with her and about how time is running out. In the third part of the poem the speaker goes on to 'so', and dedicates the last part of the poem to tell her that they should have sex. ...read more.

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