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Compare chapter 1 of 'Great Expectations' in which Pip first meets the convict, with chapter 39, when he meets him for the second time.

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Introduction

GCSE - Prose Study Assignment title: Compare chapter 1 of 'Great Expectations' in which Pip first meets the convict, with chapter 39, when he meets him for the second time. The title of the novel that I studied is, 'Great Expectations', written in the 19th century by Charles Dickens. Pip, an orphan often goes to the cemetery to mourn for his dead parents and brothers. While mourning one day, a convict hiding in that same cemetery scares him. All that he thinks of is to listen and obey the man. As the story evolves, we are also introduced to the sentimental part of Pip's life. He is in love with a girl named Estella but unfortunately, she doesn't like him. When Pip becomes the perfect gentleman, he inherits some fortune. He mistakes the real provider thinking it is Miss Havisham, until one night he meets the convict again. The latter claims that he is the person providing him with money. Pip was unable to accept both the truth and the man. For my assignment, I am focussing on the 1st and 39th chapter of the book, where Pip first meets the convict, and when he meets him for the second time. In the first chapter of the book, the circumstances that Pip is in are very pitiful. He is an orphan and although he has a big sister, he does not get the motherly affection he is supposed to in his life. He seems to be very drawn to the place where his parents are buried as stated, "my fancies regarding what they were like were unreasonably derived from their tombstones," (chapter 1, pg 1, line 9-10). ...read more.

Middle

shows us how isolated the place. Also, I think that the writer wants us to realise how courageous Pip is to be able to visit his beloved ones in such a place. Likewise, we understand the state of mind Magwitch is in when there is the mention of "gibbet" (chapter 1, PG 5, line 2). It is not very pleasant reminding someone of his own death. We know that he is an escaped prisoner and he is hiding in the graveyard so that the police cannot find him. Here again, we are introduced to a dilemma of a grown up person where one has to live in a haunted and isolated place and where there are only dead people around. The settings in chapter thirty- nine are more or less the same. The first meeting between Pip and Magwitch was in a way, very scary. Their second meeting, where everything is disclosed about Pip's real benefactor is again, scary. By that I mean the sense of mystery before the arrival of Magwitch. Firstly, the "wretched weather," (chapter 39,pg 298, line 19) gives the impression of something unpleasant going to happen. I think Pip is the best person having this kind of thought because he is the one embarrassed with Magwitch's presence, being careful to "close the shutters, so that no light might be seen from without, and then to close and make fast the doors," (chapter 39, pg 307, line 18-19) whereas Magwitch is the one pleased to see Pip once again. ...read more.

Conclusion

In addition to this, the writer wants to point out how the legal system enables the rich to oppress the poor. As far as Pip and Magwitch are concerned, I think the writer is showing us as readers, how people do a lot of good things in the world without expecting something in return. There are some people yet, that want good for us to express their gratefulness, like Magwitch. The lesson that the latter also teaches us is how with time, people grow wiser and realise their past mistakes. Finally, all through the story, we have seen how an orphan for whom we have so much chagrin, turns out to be a self- centered and materialistic young adult. He even goes that far as to reject Joe, who loves him more than his life. Needless to mention the man, Magwitch, who struggled to make him the person he now is and so proud of being. In addition to this, he realises not too late at the end fortunately, that no matter how much fortune one may have, it does not serve much in life, like it cannot buy love and trust. I think that the message in this story is that money does not make a person. We are much more happy poorer, than richer, taking Joe and Pip for good example. Even if Joe is poor, he is finally married to Biddy, the person he loves. Whereas Pip has got all the comfort life has to offer, but he is alone to enjoy it. He has neither a family, nor a lover by his side. 4 1 ...read more.

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