• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare chapter 1 of Great Expectations, in which Pip first meets the convict, with chapter 39, when the convict returns.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare chapter 1 of Great Expectations, in which Pip first meets the convict, with chapter 39, when the convict returns. Charles Dickens is considered to be one of the greatest English novelists of the Victorian period. This greatest of Victorian writers was born in Landport, Portsmouth, on February 7, 1812. His father John worked as a clerk in the Navy Payroll Office in Portsmouth. It was his personal experience of factory work and the living conditions of the poor that created in Dickens the compassion, which was to mark his literary works. Dickens's works are characterized by attacks on social evils, injustice, and hypocrisy. Great expectations was Charles Dickens' second to last complete novel. It was first published as a weekly series in 1860 and in book form 1861. Throughout great expectations, Dickens explores the class system of Victorian England, ranging from the most wretched criminals (Magwich) to the poor peasants of the marsh country (Joe and Biddy) to the middle class (Pumblechook) to the very rich (miss Havisham). The theme of social class is central to the novel's plot and to the essential moral theme of the book. Pip's realisation that wealth and class are less important than affection, loyalty and inner worth. Pip achieves this realisation when he is finally able to understand that, despite the admiration in which he holds Estella, one's social status is in no way connected to one's real character. ...read more.

Middle

The words used to describe the convict such as "limped...shivered...glared...growled" are all stressed to sound more convincing as well as making the convict sound like an animal. Pip is afraid of this "fearful man" because of his animal like features and wounds. The description of the convict is not easily forgotten and our imagination of him becomes almost reality. Magwich is a vague character at the beginning of the story. He meets Pip in the churchyard and appears eager to rush the conversation. He asks Pip many questions to find out more about him. Magwich was of an shambolic appearance, "A fearful man, all in coarse grey, with a great iron on his leg. A man with no hat, with broken shoes and with an old rag tied round his head. A man who had been soaked in water, smothered in mud, lamed by stones, cut by flints and stung by nettles." This emphasises the despicable image of Magwich to make the reader feel a sense of sympathy for the character of Magwich, but not much, because the sympathy is decreased because of the way he treats Pip. He speaks commonly and harshly. Furthermore he makes a lot of commands and threats, "Hold your noise!" cried a terrible voice as a man started up from among the graves, "Keep still, you little devil, or I'll cut your throat!" ...read more.

Conclusion

The convict appears very emotional and upset as he explains to Pip what he has been doing in Australia. This creates a conversation between Pip and the convict. Pip tries to change the conversation by asking Magwich about two one-pound notes that he was given by a messenger when he was a little boy. Pip demeans the convict by paying him the money back. The convict takes the money and burns it. It was probably very insulting for Magwich to be given a small amount of money compared to the hundreds he has given to Pip. When Magwitch, the convict on the marshes reveals himself as Pip's true benefactor, the only feelings Pip can have towards him are 'repugnance' and disbelief. Pip has always believed Miss Havisham to be his true benefactor, and believed that she wanted him to be with Estella. Pip thinks that Magwitch is the lowest of low, and he doesn't want to be associated with him. In conclusion, Pip learns that his wealth and social standing came from the labour of an uneducated prison inmate, turning his social perceptions inside out. The fulfilment of his hope of being raised to a higher social class turns out to be the work of a man from a class even lower than his own. The sense of duty that encourages Pip to help the convict is a mark of his inner goodness, just as it was many years ago in the swamp, but he is nevertheless unable to hide his disgust and disappointment. ?? ?? ?? ?? Prose assignment Rizwan Ahmed 11PX ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Great Expectations - Theme of class

    When he goes home, he tells his sister that there were 'immense dogs' eating from a silver basket. We see that Pip was actually the 'dog' eating off the floor. Pip has lied to his only remaining family and he is actually talking about what happened to him, throughout his visit.

  2. Lord of the Flies and Great Expectations - How circumstances cause characters to change.

    This does not mean Pip knows he has been so foolish following his wrongful great expectations, but that he is prepared to help Magwich as Magwich has him by funding Pip's dream of becoming a gentleman. Pip discovers that Mr Jagger's servant woman is Estella's mum.

  1. Compare, Contrast and Analyse Chapters 1 and 39 of Great Expectations.

    feel even more hostile, menacing and intimidating, allowing the reader to gain a greater understanding of the harsh atmosphere created by Dickens. The reader then begins to question why such a small boy is out alone in such a terrible place and engages the reader.

  2. An exploration of the ways in which issues of class and status are presented ...

    Both are travelling from a place of serenity to, in effect, a cruder, darker place. Pip is optimistic but is shocked when he arrives in a dirty, filthy, squalid, criminal and treacherous London, there is conflict between Pip's romantic view, such as of his being designed by Miss.

  1. Great Expectations - Compare Pips first and second meetings with the convict Able Magwitch ...

    This makes everything sound very quiet, eerie, and isolated. Also the use of the metaphor describing the sea "distant savage lair" emphasises how it seems so sister and dangerous. The use if this also creates an image in the reader's mind of a dark, almost ghostly sea, making the setting so far very unsettling to the reader.

  2. Discuss how Charles Dickens builds tension in Chapters 1 and in Chapter 39 of ...

    Just like Chapter one, Dickens uses his dramatic descriptions of the setting to build up anxiety. Chapter thirty nine also has very frightening prevalence's with the setting. Dickens again tries to build tension and anxiety towards a horrifying experience. At the beginning of the chapter, the reader gets to know

  1. great expectations Chapter 8

    Another example of the style of language Dickens uses to create tension is when he describes Pip mistakenly seeing Miss Havisham on a beam 'In terror of seeing the figure, and in the terror of being certain that it had not been there a moment before, I at first ran from it, and then ran towards it.

  2. How does chapter 8 prepare the reader for the novel to follow?prose coursework: great ...

    However, I believe in two other words that tell the audience about the character are lavish and ravish. Something which is lavish is in great quantity of richness, and ironically very generous. Yet, the other word, ravish, also describes Miss Havisham's potentially lovely and delightful side.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work