• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare Chapter one of 'Great Expectations', in which Pip First meets the Convict, with Chapter thirty-nine, when the convict returns

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare Chapter one of 'Great Expectations', in which Pip First meets the Convict, with Chapter thirty-nine, when the convict returns Chapter one and thirty-nine are linked in various ways. The chapters are linked through the weather, the characters, and the changes in the characters, Charles Dickens message to his readers, and life in the nineteenth century. In chapter one I felt sorry for Pip because he is scared and he feels as though he is being threatened. Although the convict is bigger then Pip and the reader sees him as a bully, we are given gentle hints of the pain he has gone through. He is described as 'soaked', 'lamed' and 'cut'. We are also told that he 'limped' and 'shivered' which tells us that he must be going through some pain. Pip is scared because he doesn't know the convict and therefore he fears the unknown. He is also young and vulnerable. Along with not knowing the convict the appearance of the convict is horrific. ...read more.

Middle

'Tell us your name?' and 'where do you live!' an example of only a few examples of these questions. These questions give him control and allow him to be dominant and in control of the conversation. In chapter thirty-nine things turn around. It is Pip, who has now become a gentleman, asking the questions. The convict has become much more respectable. He now wears a hat, which was expected of gentlemen in the ninetieth century. His language is still poor but the tone of his voice is much more respectable. This shows that he has changed, from being evil to good. This transformation would've appealed to the Victorian readers because of the huge difference in social class and now they have both seemed to have gone up a step. He is also more humble towards Pip because he realises that Pip is now more socially advanced and therefore is higher up then him. This also shows that Dickens didn't like criminals being shipped off to Australia. ...read more.

Conclusion

Dickens uses the wind as a metaphor in both chapters. He is crating a sense of foreboding. This symbolizes the return of the convict. Along with the wing a similar chilling setting has been used. In the first chapter they met in the graveyard whereas in this one they meet in a thunderstorm again when Pip is alone. This creates a mysterious effect. The line 'like discharges of a cannon' echoes the sound of the gunships when the convict first escaped from the ship. This makes the reader think that the convict is returning. In these two chapters Dickens has given a clear message to the readers that criminals can change and they deserve to be given a second chance and not to be shipped off to Australia. This book also shows us the difference in class back then and how people of different class could not get along. Dickens really criticised the society in the 19th century especially the government and was made it know that he did not believe convicts should be deported to Australia. ?? ?? ?? ?? Navjit Singh Sohal 11B English Coursework - 1 - ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Great Expectations section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Great Expectations essays

  1. Lord of the Flies and Great Expectations - How circumstances cause characters to change.

    Not so he can remain a gentleman and be miserable. This shows how Pip is finally seeing sense, he has realised that your social position does not determine the respect you get from people, but it is your personality which Pip now knows he must work on to build gaps

  2. Great Expectations - Compare Pips first and second meetings with the convict Able Magwitch ...

    Magwitch when talking to Pip is extremely vicious to him and very threatening, "Keep still, you little devil, or I'll cut your throat!" The use of exclamation marks used in most of his sentences, makes you think of him as a rude and foul person, and this makes the reader instinctively dislike Magwitch.

  1. Analysing and explaining Charles Dickens' Great Expectations; Chapter 1.

    The 12th shot is a close up of the convict neglectfully dropping Pip on the ground, gnawing and scoffing the bread that fall onto the floor from one of Pip's pockets, like a lion to it's captured prey, which pip clambers helplessly to his feet and stares with amazement at his vulgar habits.

  2. How do circumstances cause characters to change?

    Ralph was furious with Jack. Realising what he had done, Jack took his humiliation out on Piggy, punching him in the stomach and face. This shows how Jack resorted to violence again. Although at he start of the book he was mean for making his choir keep their blazers on in the blistering heat, he

  1. Great Expectations Chapter One analysis

    In chapter fifty five is quite humorous when Wemmick and Miss Skiffins have a wedding, this is demonstrated when Wemmick welcomes Miss Skiffins by saying "Halloa" rather than a formal "Hello".

  2. Pip is growing up in the first half of the nineteenth century. How great ...

    Pip, with his parents unable to protect him, is physically abused by his sister. Luckily her husband Joe is a good man, and is able to protect Pip from his sister's uncontrollable wrath. Joe is also kind enough to allow Pip to attend an apprenticeship with him, as to become

  1. Compare Chapter One Of Great Expectations, In Which Pip First Meets The Convict, With ...

    This shows that he has been educated. In chapter 39 the convict is shown in the same way as before but rich, but he is still on the run from the law as he is wanted for returning after being transported from Australia.

  2. Great Expectatios ENGLISH

    This implies that she is old and perhaps fragile. Also this could imply that the dress she has on is her wedding dress and also there are flowers but as it says it has yellowed this would imply that this is from a long time ago.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work