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Compare Dickens' presentation of Scrooge in Stave I and Stave V

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Introduction

Compare Dickens' presentation of Scrooge in Stave I and Stave V Scrooge's presentation in Stave I and in Stave V is very different. In Stave I Dickens presents Scrooge, as a cold-hearted old man who loves himself and hates Christmas. In contrast, his nephew Fred enjoys Christmas with his wife, and is so nice to Scrooge all the time whereas Scrooge is always mean to Fred, ("Bah, Humbug"). Dickens uses the weather to describe how cold it gets when Scrooge is near; the point that he is trying to make is that he is so mean that his meanness has infected the atmosphere. It tells us that Scrooge is only worried about himself and his money. ...read more.

Middle

Scrooge often refers to himself ("I", "my") and so appears mean. Dickens uses the weather to describe Scrooge as a cold-hearted miser: "a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scrapping, clutching, covetous old sinner!" The listing of emotive adjectives creates a negative impression of Scrooge that is reinforced by a range of negative similes ("as hard and sharp as flint", "as solitary as an oyster") and in particular Dickens' use of the weather." Also in Stave I, he cares nothing for the people around him and mankind exists only for the money that can be made through exploitation and intimidation. In Stave V, Dickens presents Scrooge differently and now shows a changed and positive man. ...read more.

Conclusion

The pleasant surprise that he has only been 'asleep' for one day (not three) allows Scrooge to start his generous ways on Christmas Day. The point that Dickens is trying to make is that if Scrooge can change his ways anyone can change their behaviour for the better. Scrooge has changed rapidly in the last Stave, and most of all he likes Christmas and celebrates it as a holiday instead of another working day, now he loves his neighbourhood and he is now the Godfather of tiny Tim because he has changed his bad ways and it has enabled him to survive: "Scrooge was better than his word". ?? ?? ?? ?? Sanjay Arora 08/03/05 ...read more.

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