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Compare how Charles Dickens and Harper Lee present the experience of childhood and fear in the opening chapters of ‘Great expectations’ and the closing chapters of ‘To kill a Mockingbird’.

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Introduction

Charlotte Toogood 15/10/01 Compare how Charles Dickens and Harper Lee present the experience of childhood and fear in the opening chapters of 'Great expectations' and the closing chapters of 'To kill a Mockingbird'. When looking at 'Great expectation' and 'To kill a Mockingbird' I think there are many similarities between the two. Both the authors have expressed their views through children's points of views; this is what makes them so similar. If I was to compare the experiences of childhood for both Scout and Pip there would be a lot of similarly and plenty of differences. ...read more.

Middle

" A fearful man" this shows how similar there experiences are. The characters themselves are also similar. Scout is a very boyish character; she enjoys spending time with Jem and Dill and normally wears trousers. She does not have much knowledge but is never afraid to ask Atticus "What is rape". Pip is also like this as well, he is not to sure what convicts are and is always asking Mrs Joe or Mr Joe. " What does that mean, Joe"? The difference between Pip and Scout is they see themselves in a very difference ways. ...read more.

Conclusion

"Everyone, myself expected, said no, with confidence. Nobody thought of me". At the back of his mind he is always scared. There experiences also have a lot to do with there up bring Scout has no mother but is brought up well by her father and Calpurnia " I found our father satisfactory. He plays with us, read to us...".Pip is not brought up in such a stable family, he has been brought up by his sister who does not give him a very good family atmosphere. " She made it a powerful merit in herself". This shows she looks after herself first and scout second when she should have the boy at heart. ...read more.

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