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Compare how reactions to conflict are shown in Futility and Belfast Confetti

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Introduction

Compare how reactions to conflict are shown in Futility and Belfast Confetti After analysing both poems the reaction towards conflict are shown in both different and similar ways. to begin with 'Ciaran Carson' uses various techniques in his poem to represent conflict, for example the title 'Belfast Confetti' initially suggests a celebration, however the phrase seems to pre dates the poem and refer to the screws, bolts and nails that were placed in the violent IRA bombs as shrapnel. ...read more.

Middle

which indicates the damaging results of conflict; 'clay' being used as a metaphor for the Earth-Gods creation, with the whole line referring to how god did not create us for all this conflict. From the way in which 'Wilfred Owen presented his feelings in that one phrase is similar to that of the last stanza of 'Belfast Confetti'. "My name? Where am I coming from? Where am I going?" It's as if the two poets are questioning themselves on why they are involved in this war and conflict and why the world ...read more.

Conclusion

By doing this it merges the writing effects from one line to another such as the use of onomatopoeia from the word 'explosion' which then continues putting emphasis onto the next line due to purposely missing punctuation (seen in both poems) However the poems have one clear difference to. In 'Futility' Wilfred Owen clearly expresses his feelings and emotions stating his opinion on conflict within his poem, whereas in 'Belfast Confetti' Ciaran Carson does not take sides, and doesn't say whether he codems the bombing within Irelands conflicts or not. JAMIE TAYLOR` ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

The points made in this essay are apt and elements of language, structure and form are considered; however there is not nearly enough detail or points for a GCSE piece and the whole response needs to develop to cover more of both poems in detail.

3 stars

Marked by teacher Laura Gater 07/08/2013

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