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Compare how the authors of the two texts use setting and other techniques to heighten tension and atmosphere in "I'm the king of the castle" by Susan Hill, and "The red room", by H.G Wells.

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Introduction

Compare how the authors of the two texts use setting and other techniques to heighten tension and atmosphere in "I'm the king of the castle" by Susan Hill, and "The red room", by H.G Wells. The two texts 'I'm the King of the Castle', written by Susan Hill, and 'The Red Room', written by H.G Wells, use certain techniques and atmosphere, to emphasise different aspects of their work. Some basic differences between the two texts, are 'I'm the King of the Castle" was written in the 1970s, and 'The Red Room', was written pre 20th century. The two texts refer to different things, for example, 'I'm the King of the Castle", refers bullying and it also has a sinister undertone, and "The Red Room", is a ghost story, and that means that the length is different, 'I'm the King of the Castle', is a novel and is quite a lengthy piece, and 'The Red Room', is a short story. I'm the King of the Castle' is written in the third person, and 'The red room', is written in the first person. The setting for "I'm the King of the Castle" is 'Warings', 'The red room' setting is an old castle, the castle wasn't named, this is possibly because the author thought it would heighten the tension. ...read more.

Middle

The two metaphors 'Tongue of light' and 'Island of light' develop the idea of a battle, creating a very sinister atmosphere. This idea is apparent in 'I'm the King of the Castle' when the darkness is used to create a disturbing atmosphere. 'It was very dark inside the red room. Beyond the windows, the sky was steely grey'. Ideas of darkness are used frequently in the description of Warings, especially when the writer describes the plants in the grounds. She writes about the bushes of rhododendron, which are used to describe the barriers surrounding Warings. The writer describes the plants as dark and overbearing, suggesting a malicious area. Yew trees are used in similar circumstances with their 'Dark green leathery leaves', further suggestive of closing in. The trees are tall to conjure up the overpowering characteristics of Warings. Not only outside Warings, but also inside the idea of darkness prevails, wood is dark, dark red brick. All of these ideas are combined to contribute to a feeling of evil and an eerie atmosphere of Warings. This atmosphere is crucial to 'I'm the King of the castle', because it emphasises the tension and evil in Warings, which reflects on Edmund and Kingshaw. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are many short sentences, 'Kingshaw had found the clearing now', and 'He didn't stop to look'. These suggest that Kingshaw is reacting to some sense of urgency. This moves the story quickly to a climax and the suicide of Kingshaw. Both 'I'm the King of the Castle' and 'The Red Room', use ideas of anticipation and expectation to create a build up of tension and atmosphere. On the whole, 'The Red Room', is a greater story of suspense than, 'I'm the King of the Castle', because 'The red room', uses: - personification, light and dark, repetition, language, pace and finally death to build tension and atmosphere. In 'I'm the King of the Castle', Hill uses setting and atmosphere well, so that it did in fact create tension and atmosphere. She described the grounds and the house very well, it was very convincing. She also used an awful lot of personification to build up the tension and atmosphere in the novel. H.G Wells also uses personification to build tension and atmosphere in 'The Red Room', but I don't think he did it quite as well as Susan Hill, but it still worked well. I personally prefer 'The Red Room', because it is a short ghost story, and it is easy to read, and also it is more interesting than 'I'm the King of the Castle'. ...read more.

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