• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare how the authors of the two texts use setting and other techniques to heighten tension and atmosphere in "I'm the king of the castle" by Susan Hill, and "The red room", by H.G Wells.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Compare how the authors of the two texts use setting and other techniques to heighten tension and atmosphere in "I'm the king of the castle" by Susan Hill, and "The red room", by H.G Wells. The two texts 'I'm the King of the Castle', written by Susan Hill, and 'The Red Room', written by H.G Wells, use certain techniques and atmosphere, to emphasise different aspects of their work. Some basic differences between the two texts, are 'I'm the King of the Castle" was written in the 1970s, and 'The Red Room', was written pre 20th century. The two texts refer to different things, for example, 'I'm the King of the Castle", refers bullying and it also has a sinister undertone, and "The Red Room", is a ghost story, and that means that the length is different, 'I'm the King of the Castle', is a novel and is quite a lengthy piece, and 'The Red Room', is a short story. I'm the King of the Castle' is written in the third person, and 'The red room', is written in the first person. The setting for "I'm the King of the Castle" is 'Warings', 'The red room' setting is an old castle, the castle wasn't named, this is possibly because the author thought it would heighten the tension. ...read more.

Middle

The two metaphors 'Tongue of light' and 'Island of light' develop the idea of a battle, creating a very sinister atmosphere. This idea is apparent in 'I'm the King of the Castle' when the darkness is used to create a disturbing atmosphere. 'It was very dark inside the red room. Beyond the windows, the sky was steely grey'. Ideas of darkness are used frequently in the description of Warings, especially when the writer describes the plants in the grounds. She writes about the bushes of rhododendron, which are used to describe the barriers surrounding Warings. The writer describes the plants as dark and overbearing, suggesting a malicious area. Yew trees are used in similar circumstances with their 'Dark green leathery leaves', further suggestive of closing in. The trees are tall to conjure up the overpowering characteristics of Warings. Not only outside Warings, but also inside the idea of darkness prevails, wood is dark, dark red brick. All of these ideas are combined to contribute to a feeling of evil and an eerie atmosphere of Warings. This atmosphere is crucial to 'I'm the King of the castle', because it emphasises the tension and evil in Warings, which reflects on Edmund and Kingshaw. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are many short sentences, 'Kingshaw had found the clearing now', and 'He didn't stop to look'. These suggest that Kingshaw is reacting to some sense of urgency. This moves the story quickly to a climax and the suicide of Kingshaw. Both 'I'm the King of the Castle' and 'The Red Room', use ideas of anticipation and expectation to create a build up of tension and atmosphere. On the whole, 'The Red Room', is a greater story of suspense than, 'I'm the King of the Castle', because 'The red room', uses: - personification, light and dark, repetition, language, pace and finally death to build tension and atmosphere. In 'I'm the King of the Castle', Hill uses setting and atmosphere well, so that it did in fact create tension and atmosphere. She described the grounds and the house very well, it was very convincing. She also used an awful lot of personification to build up the tension and atmosphere in the novel. H.G Wells also uses personification to build tension and atmosphere in 'The Red Room', but I don't think he did it quite as well as Susan Hill, but it still worked well. I personally prefer 'The Red Room', because it is a short ghost story, and it is easy to read, and also it is more interesting than 'I'm the King of the Castle'. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE H.G. Wells section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE H.G. Wells essays

  1. How does H.G Wells create, maintain and release tension in The Red Room?

    and a desperate need to find out what lies beyond that passage. The writer cleverly uses ways to still preserve and continues to give a gothic feeling he mentions "echoes" "shadows" it seems ironic how shadows are able to be shown when it is dark and gloomy.

  2. How do H.G Wells and E. Allen-Poe create an atmosphere of fear and tension ...

    Leaving the readers doing the same thing. The setting of the Tell-Tale Heart is of a common nature in gothic stories, the whole fact that it takes place at midnight, the witching hour, which is very relevant in that it would be dark and quiet. Also it is set in an inner city area, in an old

  1. Free essay

    Comparing The Red Room (H.G Wells) and The Yellow Wallpaper (Charlotte Perkins)

    The actual story behind the Red Room, which the young man remembers as he opens the door,' the great red room of Lorraine Castle, in which the young duke had died.' He remembers it just as he enters the room, which shows that the fear of what may happen to him is playing on his mind.

  2. Describing the setting and atmosphere of three shortstories 'the man with the twisted lip', ...

    the signal box the bells that tell him a train is coming start to vibrate but only the signal man himself can see it, it creates huge suspense as the reader will not know what is going to happen next. The narrator of the read room also uses supernatural actions.

  1. Examine the ways in which HG Wells creates atmosphere in The War of the ...

    madly, made for the first group of trees," this shows that the shock has taken a long time to sink in as most would start running as soon as they seen the organism. The next noticeable thing occurs later on, when wells uses repetition to bring horror to readers.

  2. The Red Room and The Monkey's Paw(Compare and Contrast)

    It also says in the text "fire's flickering kept the shadows and penumbra perpetually shifting and stirring". In the "Monkey's Paw" on the other hand it says "proffered seat by the fire". The guests get the seat by the fire so they can keep warm.

  1. How do the authors create atmosphere and tension in "The Monkeys Paw" and "The ...

    These words all are useful in the build up to the scare factor. In The Monkeys Paw the author also uses certain word to describe something as non human in this story the author uses this technique when describing Mr and Mrs Whites reborn son he indicates this by using the phrase "don't let it in."

  2. H.G Wells uses the setting of the short story 'The Red Room' to create ...

    It also allows the narrator to convey his or her emotions and feelings easily. The two narrators are quite different. There is a young male narrator in the Red Room; however there is an old lady writing about when she was middle aged narrating Farthing House.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work