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Compare 'Lake Isle of Innisfree' by WB Yeats with 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' by W Wordsworth.

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Introduction

Compare 'Lake Isle of Innisfree' by WB Yeats with 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' by W Wordsworth The title, 'Lake Isle of Innisfree,' tells us that the poem is about freedom and peace. You do not usually associate a 'Lake Isle' with a polluted, overcrowded city. 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' is about the city. We can tell this because of 'Westminster Bridge,' which is in the capital of England, London. 'Lake Isle of Innisfree' is written in a dreamy way. The lines are long, and flowing. Yeats tells us that this is all in his 'heart's core.' To help the flow the poem has an 'a,b rhyme.' Also on the first line of each stanza Yeats repeats words, to emphasise what he wants. ...read more.

Middle

Peace comes 'dropping from the veils of t he morning where the cricket sings.' This is at dawn when the dewdrops fall and through the silence the crickets can be heard. In the third stanza Yeats leaves his dream of 'Innisfree' and goes back to the city. 'I will arise and go now.' This is when Yeats wakes from his dream. He then goes back to the dark and gloominess of the city where there are 'pavements grey.' This is suggesting that Yeats thinks the city is dull. But in his 'deep heart's core' he could still 'hear the lake water lapping.' One thing that the sonnet title 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' does is tell us that this is set in the city of London, where as 'Lake Isle of Innisfree' told us where the poem is set and gives a feel of the peace, freedom and countryside. ...read more.

Conclusion

Wordsworth needs the beauty of the city to make him feel 'calm.' This is different from Yeats, who needs the 'peace' and tranquillity to become calm and relaxed. In 'Lake Isle of Innisfree' there is, a,b rhyme,' whereas in 'Composed upon Westminster Bridge' only has this in the last six lines. This is because in these lines Wordsworth is talking about his feeling and to God, and so the sonnet flows more. Wordsworth has a good effect on getting his message across by writing simply and to the point, yet manages to make you feel deeply about small things about how beautiful 'ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples are.' At the end of the sonnet when he address' it 'Dear God' it is as if he is thanking God for giving man the ability to make the city and everything in it. Alicia Brockington ...read more.

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