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Compare the audiences' reaction to Claudio and Benedick.

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Introduction

Compare the audiences' reaction to Claudio and Benedick The audiences reactions to Claudio and Benedick and very different but the audiences reaction nowadays and in the 16th century when Shakespeare wrote this are not that different. The modern and 16th century audiences first impressions of Claudio are that he is the perfect gentleman we get this impression from the conversation between Leonato and the messenger when Leonato says, "He hath bestowed much honour on a young Florentine called Claudio." (1.1.10) And the messenger says, "He hath bourn himself beyond the promise of his age, doing in the figure of a lamb, the feats of a lion." (1.1.13) Just these two quotes prove that they think that he is this perfect gentleman because he is a good soldier and good looking. The two audiences reaction to Benedick are slightly different the 16th century audience think that he will be the entertainment because this is a comedy the has to be some kind of person who is stupid and is the entertainment in the play the modern audience think he is an idiot a lot of the words and quotes that prove this are said by Beatrice she says things like, "Signor Mountanto?" (1.1.28) "And a good soldier to a lady." ...read more.

Middle

The modern audience think the same but they want him to get together with Beatrice and vice-versa because there are a couple of little thing that Beatrice says like, "Nobody marks you." (1.1.119) This means nobodies listing to you but for Beatrice to say this then she would have had to been listing to him in the first place. In act 3 Benedick comically role is taken over by Dogberry and the constables have taken over it from now on Benedick is more serious from now on. After the 3rd act everything changes Claudio and Benedick swap places so that Claudio becomes the immature one who is always changing his mind and Benedick becomes the serious one and doesn't change his mind because he sticks up for Hero when Claudio is shaming her. In this act Claudio shames Hero at their wedding and this proves that Claudio is childish because this is the worst thing to do if he had been a gentleman and had any manners or feelings for Hero then he would have called off the wedding quietly the night before and not shammed her in front of all her friends and family. ...read more.

Conclusion

When Claudio finds out that Hero is innocent but still thinks she is dead he changes his mind again and says he loves her this shows how fickle he is although the play he has fallen in and out of love with Hero. Then when he says he will marry Leonatos nice we think that he has changed and the he really did love Hero, but then at the wedding just before he is going to get married to Leonatos nice he says, "Why, then she's mine. Sweet, let me see your face." (5.4.55) So although Claudio has said that he will marry her he wants to see her face and by saying this he makes the audiences' think that if she is not very pretty that he will not marry her and leave a 2nd women at the alter. You can also see the difference between Claudio and Benedick in the language they use Claudio speaks in Rhyme witch is a fake but Benedick speak in verse witch is a much more real way to speak to some one you love so this is almost like Beatrice and Benedick love is real and Claudio and Hero is fake witch is probably true. ...read more.

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